Day2

  • University of Copenhagen, Denmark
  • Title:To Target or not to Target in Analytical Food Authentication
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Abstract:

Analytical methods that can offer fast, cost-effective and reliable food authenticity testing at several points in the food production and retail chain are urgently requested. Targeted methods still have much to offer but it is increasingly acknowledged that food is a complex matrix and should thus be treated and analyzed by techniques that can embrace this complexity. The use of non-targeted analytical methods in food authentication has therefore rapidly increased during the past decade.
The increasing use of non-targeted analyses across several scientific disciplines has brought together a mixture of analytical traditions and terminologies and terms such as profiling, signature, fingerprinting, analytical marker etc. are inconsistently used. Consequently, the scientific literature on food authentication often includes different approaches and a variety of definitions and nomenclature for both targeted and non-targeted analysis.
While non-targeted fingerprinting methods are still taking the initial steps into the food authenticity community much more work is required to validate and harmonize these methods and the associated data. An essential prerequisite is a common understanding of the analytical principles of targeted versus non-targeted food authentications. Novel definitions and nomenclature of targeted and non-targeted authentication methods will be proposed. Biological, chemical, and microscopy-based examples of targeted and non-targeted approaches will be presented while discussing the associated possibilities and limitations for analytical food authentication.

Biography:

Nicolai Z. Ballin has a PhD in meat and dairy authentication from the University of Copenhagen. He has nearly 20 years of experience from both official control at the Danish Veterinary and Food Administration and research at the European Commission´s research centre (JRC). He is experienced in developing and validating a diverse range of chemical and molecular biology methods for food authentication, and has been responsible for reporting of a large range of official results. Through his involvement in several food fraud cases he has gained an understanding of how food fraud is officially tackled in Europe. More recently he has been interested in the definitions and nomenclature of targeted and non-targeted analytical approaches across the different scientific disciplines.

  • Teaching Public Health Institute, Croatia
  • Title:Importance of Microbiological Media in Microbiological Control of Food
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Abstract:

Foodborne diseases interfere with the socio-economic development of society, burdening the health system and damaging the national economy, tourism and trade. The globalization of food production and trade makes the food chain longer, complicating investigations into diseases caused by food poisoning by delaying the possibility of emergency intervention at the site of the problem. The health safety of food, its nutritional value and food safety are inextricably linked. That is important for the advisory and coordinating role of public health institutions in the implementation of health assessments of human health hazards.
Laboratory for preparation of microbiological media (MM) occupies an important role in quality assurance of microbiological results in bacteriological diagnosis. The laboratory is qualified according to the requirements of ISO/IEC 17025 and maintaining the status of accredited laboratory requires continuous care for the qualifications of laboratory and the quality of work performed. Some requirements are: the process of systematically kept records documents, the technical competence of laboratories, the accuracy and reliability of microbiological test results. All this is to ensure quality services in microbiology with parasitology, there by increasing productivity of bacteriological tests and thus the whole system of microbial activity.
It is important for each laboratory to ensure the quality of the results of the measurements, which are carried out using the quality management system. The implementation of risk analysis and activity plan in routine work provides an indicator of the justification of investments in occupational safety measures, ie in preventive and / or corrective measures, all in order to reduce the risk to an acceptable measure.

Biography:

Anita Rakic has completed Ph.D. of Chemical Engineering in Environmental Protection, and passed all the required examinations with excellent achievements of Faculty of Chemistry and Technology of the University of Split. Also, she takes part in scientific meetings, symposiums and workshops which are hers scientific interest. Her scientific interest is the field of microbiological media and sterilisation.

  • French National Center for Scientific Research, France.
  • Title:Prediction of Body Fat in Male Sedentary and Athletes from Ultrasound and Anthropometric Measurements Versus DXA
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Abstract:

Background: To evaluate the accuracy of body fat percentage (BF%) estimates from a portable, non -traumatizing ultrasound device compared to dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) the reference technique.
Subjects: A total of 63 healthy men aged from 18 to 60 years participated. The patients were recruited according to a wide range of body mass index (BMI) and consequently of total fat mass. We also selected 100 athletes aged from 18 to 30 years from the French National Institute of Sports and Physical Education: 16 boxers, 4 rowers, 5 gymnasts, 6 base ball players, 19 judo players, 10 taekwondo, 7 basketball players, 21 wrestlers, 6 cyclists on track and 6 karate expert.
Methods: Ultrasound measurement (UT) were made with a sonographic US BOX in A-mode from Lecoeur Electronic Co.(Chuelles, France). We selected two preferred anatomical areas: the intra abdominal area which is often associated with metabolic risk factor and the mid- thigh area. Subcutaneous fat was located in a horizontal plane with approximately 45° axis vertebral at umbilical level and at the middle of the knee and the top thigh on anterior side.
BF(kg) and BF% measurements were obtained using a Hologic QDR-4500W (version 11.25; Hologic Bedford, Mass. USA) for the total sample. The DXA technique, which scans the whole body with an X-ray beam at two energy levels (70 and 100 Kev) is a reference method for measurement of fat mass, lean mass and mineral content. e subject lies in a supine position for 7 minutes and radiation exposure is very low.
Results:
The multiple linear regression to produce BF (kg) estimate with ultrasound dimensions on sedentary male is:
BF(kg) estimate = 0.708 BMI + 0.259 WC + 0.108 UTumb – 31.7

R² = 0.97, SEE = 1.7 kg
with BMI = Weight/Height (kg/m²) UTumb: umbilical thickness of fat (left + right)/2 side (mm); WC: waist circumference (cm).
The simplest model including BMI explained 90% of the variation of BF. Adding BMI and waist circumference in the model significantly increased the R² from 90 to 94% and decreased

SEE from 3.1 to 2.4. Moreover addition of ultrasonic measurement at umbilical level significantly increased the R² from 0.94 to 0.97 (P<0.01). The multiple linear regression equation to produce BF estimate with anthropometry and ultrasonic measurements on male athletes is: BF (kg) estimate = -4.99 BMI +0.109 BMI² +0.154 WC +0.627 UTmid-thigh + 46.19 with a concordance correlation of c =0.931. Pearson correlation R²=0.87 and SEE=1.6 kg. Predict BF% = 100 BF(kg) estimated ./ Body mass (kg). A cross-validation study was then performed with this linear regression on 62 male athletes proportionally stratified across the sports. The concordance correlation c =0.931 and SEE=1.61 kg. Conclusions: The use of an ultrasound portable device associated with anthropometric measurements allowed us to estimate %BF with a high level of accuracy according to the reference DXA. This ultrasonic technique can be used in sedentary subjects as well as high level sportsmen.

  • Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Italy
  • Title:Applicability of DNA Traceability along the Entire Wine Production Chain in the Real Case of a Large Italian Cooperative Winery
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Abstract:

Wine is frequently reported as one of the most adulterated agro-food products worldwide. Among the traceability methods available, DNA is of particular interest providing the possibility to recognize uniquely the wine production cultivar/cultivars. Several studies carried out in controlled conditions (laboratory level or small production wineries) support the use of DNA in wine traceability, but the situation can change completely when moving from controlled to uncontrolled realities. In the present study, the entire production chain, in a large cooperative Italian winery, was followed, for a monovarietal (Pinot noir PDO) and a polyvarietal (Rosso Oltrepò TGI) production. Results support the feasibility of DNA traceability from grape delivering to the whole fermentation process and through the most common oenological operations as racking and filtration. The application of most aggressive methods (as the thermovinification process) can increase DNA degradation reducing but not hampering the possibility to apply DNA for traceability purposes. A different situation concerns the storage of wine in tanks, despite the controlled temperature and light conditions, or in bottles where DNA degradation continues strongly influencing the possibility to apply traceability.

Biography:

Matteo Busconi, is associate professor of Agricultural Genetics and Ph.D. in molecular biotechnology at the Faculty of Agricultural, Food and Environmental Sciences, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore. He is lecturer, in the same University, for the courses of: Plant Physiology and Genetics; Vegetable Production and Technology; Plant Derived Products; Plant Genomics for Sustainable Agriculture and Grape and Wine Biotechnology. His research activity is mainly based on plant biodiversity, DNA analysis and DNA based traceability along the Agro-food chain. He is the author of over 60 publications in national and international scientific journals and in proceedings of national and international conferences.

  • Institute of Food Science and Technology, China
  • Title:Effects of very Fast Chilling on the Quality of Fresh Meat
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Abstract:

Fresh meat accounts for about 80% of China’s meat consumption. In recent years, affected by African swine fever and other epidemics, fresh meat transportation instead of living animal transportation has become an inevitable choice for the industry. Chilling is an essential process of fresh meat processing. Traditional chilling method takes longer time and cannot guarantee the meat quality before rigor mortis. As a fast chilling technology, very fast chilling can rapidly reduce the central temperature of the meat to −1 °C within 5 h postmortem, but its effect on the quality of fresh meat is unclear. We conducted the experiment to investigate the effect of very fast chilling technology on rigor mortis, freshness, and microbial community composition of meat. The study showed that very fast chilling can effectively inhibit the occurrence of rigor mortis, significantly reduced the total viable counts on the surface of carcasses and the counts of Corynebacterium and Psychrotrophs, as well as the content of total volatile basic nitrogen and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, thus the shelf life was extended. The above results provided the basis for the application of very fast chilling technology and offered technical support for fresh meat transportation.

Biography:

Chengli Hou PhD, Associate Professor, engaged in research on intelligent logistics and fresh meat preservation. The main research areas include: Mechanism of preservation and losses control of fresh meat; Develop new technologies for chilling, ice temperature/super ice temperature storage, active packaging, and logistics.

  • Tikrit University, Iraq
  • Title:Formulation of Natural Hydrocolloids and Virgin Coconut Oil as Plant-Based Salad Dressing
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Abstract:

Salad dressing is traditionally used as a seasoning to enhance the appetite of consumers due to its creamy mouthfeel and special flavour. Consumers are aware about the cholesterol level in egg yolk and fat’s type applied in dressing products. The aim of this study was to produce low fat and eggless salad dressing with virgin coconut oil (VCO). Hydrocolloids included xanthan gum and modified starch were use as independent variables by response surface methodology (RSM) in order to evaluate its impacts on the viscosity, stability, and firmness of the salad dressing. The findings showed that optimum values for the hydrocolloids of xanthan gum and modified starch were 1.56% and 0.10%, respectively and the optimum experimental values were stability 0.33%, texture 1506.5 g, and viscosity 162.25 mpas. The predicted and experimental data of this optimized formulation had no significant (p>0.05) differences which indicated the desired results from this study. The proximate analysis of the optimized formulation were moisture content 47.91, ash 1.91, fibre 1.57, fat 21.97, protein 1.66, carbohydrate 24.98, and caloric values 296.29. The findings of this study were similar to the commercial products which suggested high potential for using optimum values for the hydrocolloids of xanthan gum and modified starch as egg replacer and VCO in salad dressing to improve the quality and the biological functions of the product.

Biography:

Nameer Khairullah Mohammed is assistant professor in Food Science & Technology with over 10 years of experience in food science in addition to food technology and food biochemistry. He formerly worked in Tikrit university, Iraq as lecturer. After graduated from the University Putra Malaysia (UPM), Malaysia in 2018, he specialized in Food Technology in Iraq. He also holds an assistant professor from Tikrit University. His main research areas are oil extractions, microencapsultion, nanoemulsions, and dairy technology. He is author of over 25 peer-reviewed publications and many book chapters and international conferences.

  • Universidad del Valle, Colombia
  • Title:Exopolysaccharide-Based Edible Coating and Lactic Acid Bacteria with Antifungal Activity Preserved the Postharvest Quality of Cherry Tomato
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Abstract:

One of the main causes of cherry tomato postharvest loss are diseases caused by food-contaminating fungi. Currently, the use of fungicides is the main strategy to control the contamination caused by different types of fungi, but these treatments can cause side effects such as environmental contamination, impacts on human health, and the development of resistance by pathogenic strains, which have generated the need to develop new alternatives to replace the use of synthetic chemicals. Edible coatings (ECs) can preserve the quality of this crop and can serve as carriers of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), which have demonstrated inhibitory potential against phytopathogenic fungi. The effectiveness of the LAB strain Lactiplantibacillus plantarum A6 incorporated into an EC based on exopolysaccharide from Weissella confusa JCA4 on the physicochemical and microbiological quality of cherry tomato was evaluated.The fruit were artificially inoculated with the fungi Aspergillus niger, Fusarium sp., and Rhizopus stolonifer to test the antifungal potential of the coating. The physicochemical and microbiological quality of cherry tomato was studied at two storage temperatures to calculate its shelf life.
L. plantarum A6 remained viable both in the solution and on the surface of the fruit after coating, protecting the fruit against two of the three evaluated fungi (Fusarium sp. and Rhizopus stolonifer). The EC controlled weight loss, maintained firmness, and slowed the respiration rate of cherry tomato; the other physicochemical properties and the appearance of the fruit were not negatively affected. EPS composite coating containing L. plantarum A6 as antifungal agent could be a promising industrial treatment to control fungal deterioration and maintain the postharvest quality of tomatoes.

Biography:

Food scientist and engineering degree from Universidad del Valle, Cali – Colombia. He has research experience in applied food research, food microbiology, liquid and solid state fermentation, management of microorganisms for commercial use, flavor and fragrance biotechnology. His main investigation topic is the postharvest technology and decay control of fruits and vegetables with the use of lactic acid bacteria. Currently, he is a research team member engineer of flavor and fragance biotechnology at La Tour S.A. He has participated as ponent in different conferences in food science and flavor technology, and with poster presentations. He has published in food microbiology and food science and technology journals.

  • University of Cambridge, UK
  • Title:Nutritional and Functional Properties of Some Local Cultivars of Moringa Oleifera
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Abstract:

This study was carried out to evaluate the nutrient composition and functional properties of dried Moringa oleifera leaves collected from two different ecological zones in Bangladesh, Joypurhat and Mymensingh. The proximate analysis revealed that M. oleifera leaves were rich in protein content, ranging from (22.99 to 29.36%), and low in fat, from (4.03 to 9.51%), fiber, from (6.00 to 9.60%), and ash, from (8.05 to 10.38%). The vitamin C content of fresh M. oleifera leaves ranged from (187.96 to 278.50 mg/100 g), Ca ranged from (1.322 to 2.645%), P ranged from (0.152 to 0.304 g/100 g), and K ranged from (1.317 to 2.025 g/100g). The functional properties included WAC (158.00-415.00%), FC (28.30-117.65 ml/l,) and FS (333.33-1000 ml/l). Together, these findings indicate that M. oleifera leaves are rich in vital phytonutrients, suggesting a promising balance of food ingredients for human and animal diets.

  • Cornell University, USA
  • Title: Agricultural and Supply Chain Impacts of the Pandemic, with Special Emphasis on the Dairy Sector
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Abstract:

Food supply chains in North America have become remarkably efficient, supplying an unprecedented variety of items at a low cost. The initial stages of the COVID-19 pandemic and the severe restrictions on dining outside the home exposed the risk of a system that assumes predictable sales and highly reliable transportation systems. Despite early fears and disruptions, the food sector, from farm to retailer, has proven to be quite resilient in total, although there is a huge range of impacts on specific businesses. In the main, agricultural production for major commodities continued uninterrupted. Food processors maintained their output and adapted to a very different distribution opportunity. Consumers had no problem finding food, although there may have been disruptions in certain items at any point in time. A common theme in assessing the impacts across the six major food categories that were examined is the growing importance of understanding the whole supply chain. An important but as yet unresolved question is whether the pandemic experience results in a fundamental reassessment of supply chain vulnerabilities and risks that will cause changes in operating practices and strategies. Enhanced and more aggressive protocols related to worker health seem most likely. Insofar as current systems have tended toward a rather high degree of specialization in production and sales, another example might be greater consolidation of firms, diversification of products, and a greater diversity of customers. At the end of the supply chain there are questions about lasting changes in consumer food buying behavior, including more online shopping for basic foods, meal kits, or prepared meals. There might also be heightened interest in shorter supply chains and more local food systems. It is too early to safely anticipate the answers to these questions, but industry surveys and past behavior would suggest that this experience will have some lasting effects and consumer responses will be especially important in driving behavior.

Biography:

Andrew Novakovic served on the faculty of the Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management at Cornell University for 42, until his retirement in 2020. His primary interest has been dairy markets and policy, but he also is broadly interested in agricultural and food policy. Although officially retired, Dr. Novakovic maintains professional activity in teaching, public outreach and scholarship related to his field of expertise. He is an active participant in the International Dairy Federation and currently serves as an elected member of its Scientific and Programme Coordination Committee.

  • University of Campinas, Brazil
  • Title:Mustard Grains, Germination, Phenolic Compounds and Antioxidants: How Can They Interact?
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Abstract:

Mustard grains are known for centuries as an important commercially condiment in all of the world with a huge variety of use and applications. Our research group has been studying this promising grain to improve its biological properties. To begin, choosing the best solvent combination to recover phenolic compounds with antioxidant activity potential was encouraged. We reported for the first time an optimization study for recovery of phenolic compounds from mustard grains in order to obtain extracts with better antioxidant properties. Continuing studies, germination was chosen as a natural process due the actual tendency to valorize the spontaneous process and knowing that the germination is an efficient and economical process that promotes dynamic and complex positive changes in bioactive compounds and nutritional quality of grains. The main questions raised in our research were: How could we germinate mustard grains since changes during the process are peculiar for each grain? How germination affects the antioxidant potential and phenolic compounds composition? So, the first step was to analyze different germination parameters correlated with antioxidant potential. Also, to better understand those complex transformations, our research group investigate how the variation of free and insoluble-bound phenolics affected the antioxidant properties of mustard grains when submitted to different germination parameters. The identification of the bioactive compounds by chromatography techniques was also important to the final discussion. Given the positive results obtained, we can conclude that germinated mustard grains have the potential for application as a functional and nutraceutical food.

Biography:

Gabriela is a second year PhD student in Food Science at University of Campinas. She receives her master degree in Food Science at the same University (2019) under supervision of Prof. Dr. Ruann Janser Soares de Castro. The title of her research was “Mustard grains as source of compounds with antioxidant properties: a study based on germination, extraction and identification processes”. Since them, her research focus is on mustard grains germination and their biochemical transformations linked to the functional properties. Gabriela graduated in Food Science at University of São Paulo in 2016 with an exchange period of 11 months in France, Bordeaux at Bordeaux Science Agro with an internship at Science Institute of Vine and Wine (Institut des Sciences de la Vigne et du Vin) for 8 weeks.

  • National University of La Pampa, Argentina
  • Title:Brucella suis in Wild Animals and its Implication in Humans
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Abstract:

Brucellosis is one of the most common zoonoses, which affects multiple species. Brucella suis is responsible for a substantial proportion of infections in humans. The B. suis biovar 1 infection in cattle is an emerging veterinary an public health problem. Little is known about the presence of B. suis in wild fauna. In Argentina seroprevalence of Brucella sp was reported in fox (Lycalopex gymnocercus), wild boar (Sus scrofa), European hare (Lepus europaeus), armadillos (Chaetophractus villosus) in Buenos Aires, La Pampa and Patagonia province. Brucella suis biotype 1 was isolated from hare in Buenos Aires and La Pampa. It has also been isolated from armadillos in La Pampa. Hares infected with B. suis biovar 1 exhibited typical lesions of the disease. Nevertheless armadillos have not macroscopically observable lesions. However, histology revealed small internal abscesses (1 mm) in the parenchyma of liver and spleen. Under experimental conditions Brucella was isolated from the spleen, liver, mesenteric lymph node, uterus, urine and testicles samples. In Argentina, as in many countries, there are an underestimation and a sub notification of human cases of brucellosis. From 2009 to 2011, 1040 sera from human resulted positive by serology to brucellosis. Blood cultures were perform in some patients, being able to isolate B. suis biovar 1 in 53% of them and B. abortus in 27%. Although the source of infection is unknown in all of these cases. In rural areas armadillos and hare are hunted and consumed, by humans. However until now it is not available evidence indicating that armadillos and hare can transmit brucellosis to domestic animals, humans or other wildlife by direct contact The route of transmission to humans could be the ingestion of contaminated food, products or undercooked meat or by manipulating these animals at the time of extracting their skin and offal. Only careful and systematic monitoring will help to know the impact of wild animals on the transmission of this zoonotic disease.

Biography:

Marta Susana Kin is Deputy Professor and assistant Professor of the Department of Biology and the Department of Natural Resources of the Faculty of Exact and Natural Sciences of the National University of La Pampa (UNLPam), Argentina. He graduated in Biological Sciences from the National University of La Pampa in 1988, and has a PhD in Biology with an outstanding degree from the National University of the South (UNS) – Argentina, in 2015. He has completed an internship at the University of Malaga, Spain. In the research field, his studies focus on the field of zoonotic diseases in wild animals and the taphonomic analysis of vertebrates among others. He has published 29 research articles and participated in conferences and congresses with about 100 abstracts presented. Among other activities she has been advisor in many Thesis and served as a jury in different academic postulations, as well as she has been part of the Evaluation Committee thesis at UNLPam. She has also participated in numerous research projects as a participant, co-director and director

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