Day2

  • Tikrit University, Iraq
  • Title:Formulation of Natural Hydrocolloids and Virgin Coconut Oil as Plant-Based Salad Dressing
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Abstract:

Salad dressing is traditionally used as a seasoning to enhance the appetite of consumers due to its creamy mouthfeel and special flavour. Consumers are aware about the cholesterol level in egg yolk and fat’s type applied in dressing products. The aim of this study was to produce low fat and eggless salad dressing with virgin coconut oil (VCO). Hydrocolloids included xanthan gum and modified starch were use as independent variables by response surface methodology (RSM) in order to evaluate its impacts on the viscosity, stability, and firmness of the salad dressing. The findings showed that optimum values for the hydrocolloids of xanthan gum and modified starch were 1.56% and 0.10%, respectively and the optimum experimental values were stability 0.33%, texture 1506.5 g, and viscosity 162.25 mpas. The predicted and experimental data of this optimized formulation had no significant (p>0.05) differences which indicated the desired results from this study. The proximate analysis of the optimized formulation were moisture content 47.91, ash 1.91, fibre 1.57, fat 21.97, protein 1.66, carbohydrate 24.98, and caloric values 296.29. The findings of this study were similar to the commercial products which suggested high potential for using optimum values for the hydrocolloids of xanthan gum and modified starch as egg replacer and VCO in salad dressing to improve the quality and the biological functions of the product.

Biography:

Nameer Khairullah Mohammed is assistant professor in Food Science & Technology with over 10 years of experience in food science in addition to food technology and food biochemistry. He formerly worked in Tikrit university, Iraq as lecturer. After graduated from the University Putra Malaysia (UPM), Malaysia in 2018, he specialized in Food Technology in Iraq. He also holds an assistant professor from Tikrit University. His main research areas are oil extractions, microencapsultion, nanoemulsions, and dairy technology. He is author of over 25 peer-reviewed publications and many book chapters and international conferences.

  • San Ignacio de Loyola University, Peru
  • Title:Development and Application of Biodegradable Packaging by Blown Extrusion
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Abstract:

Most of food packaging is mainly petroleum based, trhough plastic precisely. These plastics bring many benefits such as protection, transportation and increasing the shelf life of food. Thus, plastic gained popularity over the years increasing its production and becoming the standard for food packaging. However, there are increasing concerns about its usage and the disposal due to the accumulation in natural habits.This lecture will discus the production of biodegradable food packaging using the same technologies as for plastic packaging, particularly we will discuss blown extrusion. It will contrast the laboratory production (casting technique) vs. extrusion and offer a comparison from a point of view of mechanical properties of the packaging. As applications, it will focus on fruit and vegetables.

Biography:

Alejandro Marzano-Barreda is a Professor of Food Technology and Food Packaging Design in Faculty of Food Engineering at Universidad San Ignacio de Loyola (Peru). Prior to joining the Food Engineering Faculty, Marzano-Barreda serve for 6 years as Senior R&D Specialist specialist in different fields in the agro-industrial sector such as meat, fruits a vegetable processing in Peru and Central America.
Marzano-Barreda is graduate of Zamorano University (B.Sc.Food Science and Technology, Honduras, 2013) and of Londrina State University (M.Sc. in Food Science, Brazil, 2018) where he has part of the Polibiotec research group. Marzano-Barreda is author of journal articles in the field of biodegradable packaging and active packaging.

  • University of Warsaw, Poland
  • Title:High Temperature Triggers the Antioxidant Action of Two Two Edible Isothiocyanates: Sulforaphane and Erucin. Effect of Sulfenic Acids and Methylsulfinyl Radicals as Radical Trapping Antioxidants
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Abstract:

Sulforaphane (SFN) and erucin (ERN) are isothiocyanates (ITCs) bearing, respectively, methylsulfinyl and methylsulfanyl groups. Their chemopreventive and anticancer activity is attributed to ability to modulate cellular redox status due to induction of Phase 2 cytoprotective enzymes (indirect antioxidant action) but many attempts to connect the bioactivity of ITCs with their radical trapping activity failed. Both ITCs are evolved from their glucosinolates during food processing of Cruciferous vegetables, therefore, we studied antioxidant behaviour of SFN/ERN at elevated temperature in two lipid systems. Neither ERN nor SFN inhibit the oxidation of bulk linolenic acid (below 100C) but both ITCs increase oxidative stability of soy lecithin (above 150C). On the basis of GCMS analysis we verified our preliminary hypothesis [1] about participation of sulfenic acids and methylsulfinyl radicals as radical trapping agents responsible for the antioxidant effect of edible ITCs during thermal oxidation of lipids at elevated temperatures (above 140C).[2]

Bibliography:
[1] Cedrowski, J., Dąbrowa, K., Krogul-Sobczak, A., Litwinienko, G.A lesson learnt from food chemistry-elevated temperature triggers the antioxidant action of two edible isothiocyanates: Erucin and sulforaphane. Antioxidants 2020, 9, 1090. DOI: 10.3390/antiox9111090
[2] Cedrowski, J., Dąbrowa, K., Przybylski, P., Krogul-Sobczak, A., Litwinienko, G. Antioxidant activity of two edible isothiocyanates: Sulforaphane and erucin is due to their thermal decomposition to sulfenic acids and methylsulfinyl radicals. Food Chemistry 2021, 353, 129213. DOI: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2021.129213

  • Universidad del Valle, Colombia
  • Title:Exopolysaccharide-Based Edible Coating and Lactic Acid Bacteria with Antifungal Activity Preserved the Postharvest Quality of Cherry Tomato
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Abstract:

One of the main causes of cherry tomato postharvest loss are diseases caused by food-contaminating fungi. Currently, the use of fungicides is the main strategy to control the contamination caused by different types of fungi, but these treatments can cause side effects such as environmental contamination, impacts on human health, and the development of resistance by pathogenic strains, which have generated the need to develop new alternatives to replace the use of synthetic chemicals. Edible coatings (ECs) can preserve the quality of this crop and can serve as carriers of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), which have demonstrated inhibitory potential against phytopathogenic fungi. The effectiveness of the LAB strain Lactiplantibacillus plantarum A6 incorporated into an EC based on exopolysaccharide from Weissella confusa JCA4 on the physicochemical and microbiological quality of cherry tomato was evaluated.The fruit were artificially inoculated with the fungi Aspergillus niger, Fusarium sp., and Rhizopus stolonifer to test the antifungal potential of the coating. The physicochemical and microbiological quality of cherry tomato was studied at two storage temperatures to calculate its shelf life.
L. plantarum A6 remained viable both in the solution and on the surface of the fruit after coating, protecting the fruit against two of the three evaluated fungi (Fusarium sp. and Rhizopus stolonifer). The EC controlled weight loss, maintained firmness, and slowed the respiration rate of cherry tomato; the other physicochemical properties and the appearance of the fruit were not negatively affected. EPS composite coating containing L. plantarum A6 as antifungal agent could be a promising industrial treatment to control fungal deterioration and maintain the postharvest quality of tomatoes.

Biography:

Food scientist and engineering degree from Universidad del Valle, Cali – Colombia. He has research experience in applied food research, food microbiology, liquid and solid state fermentation, management of microorganisms for commercial use, flavor and fragrance biotechnology. His main investigation topic is the postharvest technology and decay control of fruits and vegetables with the use of lactic acid bacteria. Currently, he is a research team member engineer of flavor and fragance biotechnology at La Tour S.A. He has participated as ponent in different conferences in food science and flavor technology, and with poster presentations. He has published in food microbiology and food science and technology journals.

  • RMIT University, Australia
  • Title:Chemometric Approach in Monitoring the Generation of Volatile Compounds in Model Milk Systems with Low-Frequency Ultrasound
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Abstract:

The application of low-frequency ultrasound in dairy processing offer prominent benefits in improving the functionality of milk and dairy products, as well as the dairy processing efficiency. However, chemical and physical effects from ultrasound can cause the generation of undesirable volatile compounds which may result in off-flavours. The underlying research investigated the volatile profile in sonicated model milk systems with different ratios of caseins, whey proteins and fat using chromatography. Furthermore, the corresponding changes in milk components as affected by ultrasound were monitored via Infrared spectroscopy. Low- frequency ultrasound were performed at 20 kHz up to 10 min. The volatile compounds including hydrocarbons, esters, aldehydes, ketones, and alcohols which appeared to be the products of lipid oxidation and protein degradation were characterised in sonicated milk. Chemometric analysis showed that the fat content and the variation of milk proteins (caseins and whey proteins) had negligible effects on the generation of volatile compounds, whereas sonication time significantly influenced the intensities of volatiles produced in sonicated milk systems. The application of ultrasound for a short period less than 5 min were recommended to minimise the formation of undesirable volatile compounds. The research findings will add valuable insights into the volatile profiles and advance the application of low-frequency ultrasound within the dairy industry.

Biography:

Anh Bui is a final year doctoral candidate at RMIT University, supervised by Dr. Jayani Chandrapala, A/Prof Daniel Cozzolino and Dr. Bogdan Zisu. She holds a Master degree in the field of Food Science and Technology from the University of Queensland and a Bachelor’s degree in Food Technology Engineering from Can Tho University, Vietnam. She has wealth of experience in working as a food specialist in Can Tho Food Safety and Hygiene Department in Vietnam, and as a lecturer at Can Tho Technical and Economic College in Vietnam. Her PhD research focused on investigating the generation of volatiles in model milk systems containing different ratios of milk proteins and fat as affected by low-frequency sonication. The findings of her research contribute in minimising the formation of off flavours in milk and advance the use of this non thermal technology within the dairy industry.

  • Hebrew University, Israel
  • Title:Lipidome Changes, with A Focus on Phospholipids, Due to Feeding Systems and Processing in Goat Milk
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Abstract:

We evaluated the effects of processing – pasteurization and yoghurt manufacturing – on some health-promoting lipidome components in milk from two feeding treatments – brushland grazing or hay-feeding in confinement – in dairy goats. The contents of fat and protein were higher, and of urea, lower, in grazing goats. Fatty acid composition – at the exception of saturated fatty acids – was affected by dietary management and milk processing. Phospholipid contents was lower in confined goats, with little effect for processing. The phospholipid-totriglyceride ratio was decreased by pasteurization. Sensitivity to pasteurization of phospholipid composition differed between feeding treatments. The percentage of sphingomyelin increased following pasteurization, with no response for fermentation to yoghurt. These results can be exploited to modulate health-promoting fats in dairy products.

Biography:

Dr. Glasser received his Ph.D. from the Hebrew University in 2009. His Ph.D. thesis focused on the development of Fecal Near InfraRed Spectroscopy (F-NIRS) for the prediction of small ruminant diets under free-ranging conditions. Currently he is a farm manager (200 head goats & sheep) and a researcher at the Ramat-Hanadiv Nature Park, Israel. Dr. Glasser is a lecturer at several academic and technical institutions, among them the Hebrew University, Tel-Hai College and the Galilee Institute. His research is focused on several topics within the framework of livestock environment and human interactions. His main topics of research are small ruminant nutrition and grazing behavior, effects of plant secondary compounds on internal parasites, effects of livestock grazing on landscape vegetation structure, the interactions between nutrition and milk quality, goat cross-breeding, and animal welfare.

  • University of Cambridge, UK
  • Title:Nutritional and Functional Properties of Some Local Cultivars of Moringa Oleifera
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Abstract:

This study was carried out to evaluate the nutrient composition and functional properties of dried Moringa oleifera leaves collected from two different ecological zones in Bangladesh, Joypurhat and Mymensingh. The proximate analysis revealed that M. oleifera leaves were rich in protein content, ranging from (22.99 to 29.36%), and low in fat, from (4.03 to 9.51%), fiber, from (6.00 to 9.60%), and ash, from (8.05 to 10.38%). The vitamin C content of fresh M. oleifera leaves ranged from (187.96 to 278.50 mg/100 g), Ca ranged from (1.322 to 2.645%), P ranged from (0.152 to 0.304 g/100 g), and K ranged from (1.317 to 2.025 g/100g). The functional properties included WAC (158.00-415.00%), FC (28.30-117.65 ml/l,) and FS (333.33-1000 ml/l). Together, these findings indicate that M. oleifera leaves are rich in vital phytonutrients, suggesting a promising balance of food ingredients for human and animal diets.

  • University of Cambridge, UK
  • Title:Assessment of Productivity and Profitability of Wheat Using Nutrient Expert® -Wheat Model in Jhapa District of Nepal
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Abstract:

Wheat is the third most important cereal crop in Nepal after rice and maize both in area and production, but its productivity of 2.3 tonne ha−1 is very less compared to other developed countries (6 tonne ha−1 for Switzerland and China) in the world. The main cause of low wheat yield in Nepal is the improper and inadequate use of fertilizer devoid of site specific nutrient management practices. Therefore, a farmers’ field experiment was conducted during November 2015 to April 2016 to rectify the best fertilizer management options at two sites of Damak and Gauradaha in Jhapa district in eastern-Terai of Nepal using Nutrient Expert®-Wheat model. The research was accomplished in Randomized Complete Block Design with 2 treatments and 20 replications, considering farmers’ field as replication. Two treatments included in the experimentation were NE® (Nutrient Expert Recommendation) and FFP (Farmer’s Fertilizer Practices). The statistical result revealed the highly significant difference in terms of number of effective tiller m−2, plant height, filled grain per spike, spike length, grain, straw and biological yields and harvest index. The highest yield (4.71 tonne ha−1) was obtained from NE field than FFP (2.99 tonne ha−1). On an average, NE based practices produced 58 % higher yield in comparison to FFP. NE based treatment produced significantly higher biomass yield, yield attributes and cost-benefit ratio than FFP treatments. Field experiment validation confirmed that the Nutrient Expert® Wheat model could be used as the most adoptable and practical precision decision support system tool to make a more authentic fertilizer recommendation in eastern-Terai of Nepal.

Biography:

The author was born on 20th March 1994 at Shuklaphanta Municipality, Kanchanpur, Nepal. He is the youngest son among two sons of Mr. Jaya Raj Bhatta and Mrs. Shanti Devi Bhatta. He has completed his secondary education from Anirudra Higher Secondary School, Bansamiti, Kanchanpur in 2009. He joined to Institute of Agriculture and Animal Science (IAAS), Lamjung Campus, Sundar Bazzar in 2013 for the course of B.Sc Ag. He completed his bachelor’s degree with a prestigious merit position in 2017. After completion of B.Sc. Ag, he joined as a Food Security Field support Specialist (FSFSS) in Peace Corps, Nepal in 2018. In 2018 he joined by free competition to peruse a Master of Science degree in Agronomy, at IAAS, Kritipur, Kathmandu and completed his Msc. Ag in agronomy in 2020 with a prestigious merit position He has participated many training, workshop and seminar on agriculture research and extension
technologies.

  • The Arctic University of Norway, Norway
  • Title:Sustainability Indicators for Sustainably-Farmed Fish
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Abstract:

To be sustainable, farmed fish should be environmentally suitable, biologically ideal, socially acceptable and economically viable. As these sustainability indicators (SIs) strongly influence consumers’ fish pur- chase intent, farms should report them as a balanced source of sustainability information. However, in the literature, little attention has been paid to biological indicators in assessing aquaculture sustainabil- ity, nor to the extent of the SIs. Furthermore, the assessed SIs have not been examined by consumers. Therefore, this study measures consumers’ perceived value of these. Consumers’ sustainability knowl- edge and attitude towards farm-raised fish are also taken into account. Multinomial logit and basic latent class logit models are employed, together with a direct survey of households in Bangladesh. The results demonstrate that a low level of water use and appropriate feeding in the production process (e.g., environmental and biological indicators) of farmed fish increase consumers’ utility and that they are willing to pay a price premium for these attributes. Consumers look for the ‘safety label’, which indicates inter-mediately, averagely, and fairly sustainable farmed fish. Initially, consumers prefer averagely sustainable fish, but when they eat a high amount of farmed fish in their total fish consumption, they are more likely to prefer fairly sustainable ones, which are high sustainable. Therefore, the study results indicate that produced fish should be marketed with environmental and biological sustainability indicators, including food safety labels. Additionally, a close monitoring system will increase social acceptability, leading to sustainable fish farming and consumption.

Biography:

Mohammed Ziaul Hoque has studied MSc in Consumers Studies with the Economics of Consumers and Household group at Wageningen University, Netherlands and Master in Business Administration in Finance at University of Chittagong, Bangladesh. The Consumers and Experimental Economics are his research field where the area of interest is to foster policy innovations focusing research techniques of Consumers and Behavioural Economics. He is the author of the textbook of Introduction to Business and Principles of Finance, and his research has already been published with the Elsevier, Sage, Springer and Taylor and Francis. Currently, he is the doctoral fellow looking for an innovative direction to strengthening the effectiveness of food policy by examining the impact of seafoods’ demand insights that nudge consumers into beneficial directions in choices. The analysis of consumer preferences for focusing on product attributes will help in analysing peoples’ behaviour that can help to formulate effective policies.

  • Federal University of Goias, Brazil
  • Title:Better Fatty Acids Profile in Fillets of Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis Nloticus) Supplemented with Fish Oil
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Abstract:

Fish is an important source of high-quality; readily digested protein in the human diet, a rich source of minerals and vitamins, and it contains lipids that are recognized as having high nutritional value. Tilapia has become the most popular aquaculture product in the world; with the Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) considered the most desirable species. The fatty acid (FA) composition of freshwater fish is characterized by high levels of n-6 PUFAs, mainly linoleic acid (C18:2n-6). In contrast, marine plankton and the fish that feed on them present low levels of n-6 PUFAs and a predominance of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, C20:5n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C22:6n-3). Marine fish oil is rich in n-3 long-chain PUFAs (LC-PUFAs). Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are biologically important compounds that confer protection against diseases, including cardiovascular diseases and rheumatoid arthritis. They also display anticarcinogenic properties and support the immune system and brain functions. Dietary supplementation with marine fish oil tends to increase the concentration of n-3 LC-PUFAs in the muscular tissue of the freshwater fish. An increase in levels of the n-3 series of FAs was observed in tilapia fillets that were supplemented. Modern human diets have ratios of n-6/n-3 ranging from 15:1 to 20:1, in contrast to an ideal range of 1:1 to 4:1. The high concentration of EPA and DHA in the fish oil was reflected in nutritionally satisfactory ratios of n-6/n-3 in tilapia fillets. Using a good marketing strategy it is possible to add economic value to the fillet making improved profitability.

Biography:

Graduated in Veterinary Medicine from the Federal University of Minas Gerais (1989), Master in Veterinary Medicine from the Federal University of Minas Gerais (1993) and doctorate in Food Science from the State University of Campinas (2004). He is currently an associate professor at the Federal University of Goias. He has experience in the Inspection and Technology of Meat and Meat Products and Food Science and Technology, with an emphasis on Evaluation and Quality Control of Meat and Meat Products, acting mainly on the following topics: natural antioxidants and fatty acids in meat.

  • Cornell University, USA
  • Title: Agricultural and Supply Chain Impacts of the Pandemic, with Special Emphasis on the Dairy Sector
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Abstract:

Food supply chains in North America have become remarkably efficient, supplying an unprecedented variety of items at a low cost. The initial stages of the COVID-19 pandemic and the severe restrictions on dining outside the home exposed the risk of a system that assumes predictable sales and highly reliable transportation systems. Despite early fears and disruptions, the food sector, from farm to retailer, has proven to be quite resilient in total, although there is a huge range of impacts on specific businesses. In the main, agricultural production for major commodities continued uninterrupted. Food processors maintained their output and adapted to a very different distribution opportunity. Consumers had no problem finding food, although there may have been disruptions in certain items at any point in time. A common theme in assessing the impacts across the six major food categories that were examined is the growing importance of understanding the whole supply chain. An important but as yet unresolved question is whether the pandemic experience results in a fundamental reassessment of supply chain vulnerabilities and risks that will cause changes in operating practices and strategies. Enhanced and more aggressive protocols related to worker health seem most likely. Insofar as current systems have tended toward a rather high degree of specialization in production and sales, another example might be greater consolidation of firms, diversification of products, and a greater diversity of customers. At the end of the supply chain there are questions about lasting changes in consumer food buying behavior, including more online shopping for basic foods, meal kits, or prepared meals. There might also be heightened interest in shorter supply chains and more local food systems. It is too early to safely anticipate the answers to these questions, but industry surveys and past behavior would suggest that this experience will have some lasting effects and consumer responses will be especially important in driving behavior.

Biography:

Andrew Novakovic served on the faculty of the Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management at Cornell University for 42, until his retirement in 2020. His primary interest has been dairy markets and policy, but he also is broadly interested in agricultural and food policy. Although officially retired, Dr. Novakovic maintains professional activity in teaching, public outreach and scholarship related to his field of expertise. He is an active participant in the International Dairy Federation and currently serves as an elected member of its Scientific and Programme Coordination Committee.

  • Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham, India
  • Title:Assessment of Water Quality Index and Study of the Impact of Pollution on the Rivers of Kerala
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Abstract:

Pollution of water bodies will have dire consequences on an already water stressed country like India. Multiple parameters like pH, hardness, dissolved solids, dissolved oxygen, biochemical oxygen demand etc. are measured to assess water quality. However, it is difficult for a layman to understand the significance of the various parameters being monitored by the Pollution Control Board. Water Quality Index, which encompasses the impact of these physical and chemical parameters on the quality of a water sample, can be used as an effective tool to convert convoluted parameters into a more comprehensible form. This study develops a generalized and reliable C language code to quickly compute the Water Quality Index for different water bodies. The Water Quality Index is calculated, using the code, for some of the rivers in key geographic locations of Kerala. It has been found that most of the rivers in the central part of Kerala like rivers Periyar and Muvattupuzha are of poor water quality, while most of the rivers in the southern part of Kerala are of good water quality. Some of the rivers in northern part of Kerala like rivers Kadalundi have good water quality, while rivers like Chaliyar have poorer water quality. The comparison of two models for calculating the Water Quality Index is also presented.

Biography:

Dr. S N Jyothi is Professor and Principal at Amrita School of Engineering, Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham. She earned her Bachelor and Master’s degree in Chemical Engineering from University of Calicut, India and received her Ph. D. degree in Chemical Engineering from Indian Institute of Technology, Madras, India. She has authored 15 original papers in the area of control engineering and has published more than 7 papers in the field of environmental engineering and science. Her main research interest is focused on the prevention and control of pollution in water and air. She has also worked on improving the solid waste management practices in the University. Her recent research work is focused on identifying the sources of pollution in the rivers of Kerala and proposing optimized solutions to effectively improve the water quality of the rivers.

  • Nestlé Institute of Food Safety & Analytical Sciences,Switzerland
  • Title:Challenge to Evaluate Regulatory Compliance for Nutrients in Infant Formulas with Current State-of-the-Art Analytical Reference Methods
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Abstract:

To ensure products meet the highest standards, the global infant formula industry works to ensure a thorough understanding of the capability of an analytical method (that is the ability of a method to produce test results within the regulatory limits) as an additional key parameter when establishing compositional criteria for nutrients in infant formula. All analytical test methods have some uncertainty. The key factor is understanding method variability in the context of overall variability, which also includes variation in raw materials/ingredients and the manufacturing process. The overall variability must fit within the regulatory limits. By using existing performance data of recently established international Official Methods/Standards it was shown that for products with a manufacturing target at the midpoint of regulations, the probability of obtaining an analytical result outside the regulatory requirements due to analytical variation of the method alone can be as high as 19%. This can cause legal uncertainties. This work supports a risk management approach that takes into consideration the analytical method capability when establishing regulatory limits for nutrients in infant formulas.

Biography:

Erik J.M. Konings PhD is Program Manager at Nestlé Research where he provides leadership to global quality, laboratory and regulatory teams to engage in strategic local activities to drive alignment/harmonization of analytical methods and partners with government and non-government organizations in the development of standards for analytical methods. He holds an MSc in Epidemiology and PhD in Health Sciences from Maastricht University, the Netherlands.

  • University Hospital of Copenhagen, Denmark
  • Title:Older Patients’ Use of Technology for A Post-Discharge Nutritional Intervention Gave Better Appetite, Muscle Strength, Quality of Life and Depression Score.
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Abstract:

Background: Malnutrition is frequent in older people and a precursor for morbidity and hospitalisation; furthermore low intake and weight loss during and after hospitalisation is well-described. Such patients are often excluded from technology projects on account of lack of skills. This is a barrier for their access to many current and future health care offers. Objectives: To test the acceptability, feasibility and preliminary efficacy of technology-supported energy-and protein-enforced homedelivered meals for older patients discharged from hospital. Design: Mixed method design including a quasi-experimental controlled feasibility trial and embedded qualitative interviews. Participants: Older medical patients (mean age 79.4 years; women 66.7%) at nutri-tional risk and discharged to own home were included consecutively to first the control group (n = 18) and later the intervention group (n = 18). Nine intervention and 16 control group patients completed the project. Methods: Intervention group received: 1) enriched meals delivered to participants’ homes 12 weeks after discharge, and 2) a tablet computer combining goal setting for intake with self-monitoring and feedback. Control group were treated as usual. Data collection was done at baseline, and at six and 12 weeks follow-up. Feasibility evaluation focused on 1) inclusion and retention and 2) acceptability and functionality of the intervention. Efficacy primary endpoint: Muscle strength and BMI. Secondary: Health related quality of life (HRQoL), depression; readmissions, mortality. Results: Technology challenges were related to immaturity of the out-of hospital app version; however, participants were motivated and capable of using the device. Inclusion and retention was challenged by the acceptability of the nutritional intervention and exhaustion among patients. Mortality was high. Although weaker at baseline the intervention group increased their muscle strength more consistently than did the control group: Handgrip strength with 2.5 kg vs 0.9 kg and chairto-stand-test with 3.3 vs. 1.8 times. They also improved their depression score and HRQoL more, and patients reported increased intake, appetite, and energy in the interviews. Relatives confirmed this and also reported positive impact on their level of worry and on the relationship with the older person. Conclusion: The study provided valuable insight into appropriate methods and procedures as well as older people’s preferences and views on barriers to successful intervention and use of technology in health care. This will guide the design of a future sufficiently powered study.

Biography:

Tove Lindhardt is a registered nurse, MScN and PhD in medical science. She is the head of Research Unit for Clinical Nursing in Department of Internal Medicine in a Copenhagen University Hospital, where she leads a research programme focusing on eHealth, patient and family participation, and empowerment.

  • University of Extremadura, Spain
  • Title: Meat Derivatives with Fish Oil Microcapsules: Enrichment and Bioaccesibility of Omega‐3 Fatty Acids.
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Abstract:

This study analyses i) the potential application of fish oil microcapsules made of lecithin + maltodextrin (monolayered, Mo) and lecithin + chitosan‐maltodextrin (multi‐layered, Mu) as vehicles of eicosapentaenoic (C20:3 n‐3, EPA) and docosahexaenoic (C22:6 n‐3, DHA) acids in cooked (C‐SAU) and dry‐cured (D‐SAU) meat products and ii) the bioaccesiblity of these fatty acids. Both, Mo and Mu achieved the enrichment in EPA and DHA without influencing on the lipid composition of the enriched products. The quantity of fatty acid released at the different phases of the in vitro digestion of meat products added with microcapsules has been firstly described in the present study. The addition of fish oil microcapsules did not affect the release of fat and fatty acids of the meat products, but it influenced on the bioaccesibility of EPA and DHA. Moreover, the type meat matrix seems to be a significant effect on the released of fat and fatty acids. In this way, the addition of fish oil microcapsules of lecithin + chitosan‐maltodextrin as wall material to cooked sausages should be more appropriate than fish oil microcapsules of lecithin + maltodextrin and dry‐cured sausages to maximize the percentage of EPA and DHA available for absorption. Therefore, it could be pointed out the importance of analysing not only the quantity of EPA and DHA in the enriched foods, but also the bioavailability of these bioactive compounds in most of the possible products. These could be used to develop functional foods that provide healthier lipid profiles and promote health and welfare.

Biography:

Trinidad Pérez Palacios is a PhD in Food Technology. She comes from the University of Extremadura, in Spain, where she is working as researcher at the Meat and Meat Products Institute. She also teaches in the Master of Science and Technology of Meat. She has published more than 80 papers in JCR and around 60 congress communications. One of her main investigation lines is related to the development of functional meat products. Now, she has just finished a project focused on enriching different meat products with omega‐3 fatty acids by means of fish oil microcapsules addition

  • Cairo University, Egypt
  • Title: Phytochemical Screening and Antioxidant Activity of Some Medicinal Plants’ Crude Juices
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Abstract:

The present work was focused on evaluating the resultant crude juices from the mechanical pressing of some agricultural and food industries by-products i.e., pomegranate leaves and peels and leaves of fig, guava and olive as a source of naturalistic antioxidants. The results indicated that the amounts of polyphenols, flavonoids, tannins and anthocyanins in crude pomegranate peels juices were markedly higher than those of other crude juices under study. The polyphenolic constituents in fig leaves, pomegranate leaves and peels, guava leaves and olive leaves were distinguished using HPLC. The major compounds found in all crude juices were gallic acid, ellagic acid, naringenin, ferulic acid and methyl gallate, respectively. Pomegranate peels crude juice exhibited the highest antioxidant activity in comparison with other crude juices under study. In this context, pomegranate peels crude juice is a valuable source of health-promoting compounds, fulfilling concurrently the promising antioxidant activity that can be utilized virtually as food complements, to delay lipid oxidation and healing from particular ailments via its free radicals scavenging ability.

Biography:

Layla S. Tawfeek, PhD of biochemistry, Lecturer of biochemistry, Faculty of Agriculture, Cairo University, Giza, Egypt.

  • Madurai Kamaraj University, India
  • Title:Noncytotoxic Bacteriocin Producing Probiotics
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Abstract:

Lactic Acid Bacteria constitutes a highest percentage of bacteria among probiotic producers. They show antimicrobial activity by producing antimicrobial substances and/or stimulating mucosal immunity. Probiotic bacteria produce organic acids, hydrogen peroxide and bacteriocins as antimicrobial substances that suppress the multiplication of pathogenic and moldering bacteria. Cow milk, Curd, Homo fermented milk were collected from various places and LAB were isolated using MRS medium which supports growth of all LAB producing antimicrobial proteins. The bactericidal activity was estimated by microtiter assay etc. The bacteriocin producing isolate has a great deal of attention as novel approach to control pathogens in food stuffs and replace conventional antibiotics.

Biography:

Ramya Selvaraj is a Doctorate in Biomaterials from Central Leather Research Institute, India and a Post doctorate from Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh. Currently employed as an Assistant Professor in Thiagarajar College affiliated to Madurai Kamaraj

  • Islamic University, Kushtia, Bangladesh
  • Title:Nutrient Contents and Anti-Hyperglycemic Effects of the Immature Endosperm of Sugar Palm (Borassus Flabellifer) Fruit on Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
  • Time :

Abstract:

Sugar palm (Borassus flabellifer) cultivated and its pulp, as well as immature endosperm, is consumed popularly consumed throughout Bangladesh. Objective: The aim of this study was to elucidate the anti-diabetic effect of immature endosperm on type-2 diabetic patients. Methods: First rat model was used, then effectiveness was tested on type-2 diabetic patients. Randomly selected T2DM patients (n=30) were orally fed immature endosperm of sugar palm (IESP) twice a day beside the regular dietary intake. Results: The current study showed IESP is rich in carbohydrate, fiber, sodium, potassium, and zinc. Nineteen phytochemicals, with known anti-diabetic effects, were found to be present in the IESP. Study results clearly showed that IESP significantly reduced fasting blood glucose (FBG) levels of experimental rats. The FBG levels returned within normal range by the end of the sixth week and also maintained the normal FBG levels even after withdrawn of the feeding of IESP. The human trial also showed that the mean fasting blood glucose (FBG) level was markedly reduced from 15.74 mmol/L to 10.53 mmol/L, over four weeks feeding period, among patients who had normal body mass index (18.5-24.9). Only 16.67% of diabetic patients had irregular FBG levels, whereas 10% didn’t show a significant reduction, and 6.67% was unsuccessful because of their irregular intake of insulin. The IESP was more effective on female (p≤0.001) patients than males (p≤0.05). Conclusion: The IESP could be considered anti-hyperglycemic fruit, and this might be due to its nutrient contents, especially phytochemicals, fiber, sodium, potassium, copper, and zinc.

Biography:

Dr. Shaikh Shahinur Rahman is working presently as Associate Professor at the Department of Applied Nutrition and Food Technology of Islamic University, Bangladesh. He is a specialist in nutrition and health. He has a master’s and a doctorate in Nutrition and Food Technology from the Faculty of Biological Science of Islamic University, Bangladesh. His main research interest focuses on functional foods and preparation of novel diet for diabetes. He has published more than 28 papers in reputed journals. He has also participated in numerous research projects as a participant, co-director and director. He is an advisor of the Applied Nutrition and Food Technology (ANFT) Society. He is also a member of the Bangladesh Food and Nutrition Association (BAFNA).

  • Council for Agricultural Research and Economics (CREA), Italy
  • Title:Application of Innovative Methods for the Traceability of Organic Horticultural Crops
  • Time :

Abstract:

Different researches have been carried out over the years to investigate on new and reliable systems to test the authenticity of products obtained using organic cultivation methods. At the same time, the monitoring of some chemical components, deriving from primary and/or secondary metabolism of organic and conventional products, has highlighted the diversity induced by the two production techniques while the difference in fertilization practices has been shown to impact on the isotopic distribution of some elements present in fruits and vegetables, with particular reference to nitrogen. The INNOVABIO (‘Application of innovative methods for the traceability of organic farming products’) research project (Italian Ministry of Agricultural, Food and Forestry Policies n. 93173/12/22/2017) aims to build up an integrated system able to validate, through the acquisition of isotopic data and other chemical and biochemical parameters, the authenticity of organically managed horticultural produces. Experiments have been carried out at CREA-OFA and FEM labs on soil, leave and fruit samples of cauliflower grown at CREA-OF Monsampolo del Tronto (AP) by using six different fertilization treatments. Two organic treatments (“organic” and “1/3 organic”) were performed on a organically managed soil since many years. Three conventional treatments (“conventional”, “1/3 organic” and “2/3 organic”) were carried out on a formerly conventionally managed soil. Finally, one organic treatment “organic + agroecological service crops” was performed on a certified soil for organic farming within the experimental long-term field MOVE LTE (MOnsampolo VEgetable organic Long Term field Experiment). Preliminary results of the first year of project have showed that multivariate analysis of isotopic data combined with classical quality parameters (TSS, TA, cut resistance, L*, a*, b*, head height, head diameter, ascorbic acid content, total polyphenols, ORAC units) performed by Linear Discriminant Analysis gives the possibility to discriminate organic products from conventional ones thanks to the different isotopic signature impressed by the different nitrogenous source combined with the qualitative pattern of the crops, significantly affected by the different treatments.

Biography:

Simona Fabroni has completed her PhD in Food Science and Technology, University of Catania, Italy. From 2005 she has been working at the Research Center for Olive, Citrus and Tree Fruit (CREA-OFA), studying on quality and biological properties of fresh fruits and processed products focusing the attention on the investigation of the main bioactive constituents (anthocyanins, flavonoids, hydroxycinnamic acids, vitamins) and promoting the development of new technologies for the processing industry. She has conducted studies on the nutritional and nutraceutical quality of organic fruits and on traceability studies for the valorization of food products protected by European designations (Organic, PDO, PGI). From 2010 she is permanent researcher at the CREA-OFA. Total number of publications: 50, (including 3 international book chapters, 2 national book chapters and 27 indexed in Scopus peer-reviewed papers). H-index: 10 (Total citations: 441 by 409 documents).

  • University of Sao Paulo, Brazil
  • Title:The Role of the Brazilian Flora in the Chemical Profile and Biological Activities of Propolis
  • Time :

Abstract:

Propolis is a bee product containing plant resins and beeswax. Propolis and its isolated constituents exert biological effects such as antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, antidiabetics, immunomodulatory, wound healing, antitumor and antiulcer. These effects are accounted for substances contained in resins collected by bee foragers from plant exudates or young tissues. In Brazil, several propolis types from stingless bees (meliponines) and Africanized honey bees are produced in commercial scale. An emerging market of propolis from stingless bees is gaining relevance among apiculturists in Brazil. Several papers have investigated the composition and medicinal properties of meliponine propolis from several parts of the country. Comparing with honey bee propolis, similarities and differences have been noticed in the composition of Brazilian meliponine propolis. Two types of Brazilian propolis from honey bees stand out due to the amounts produced and commercialized, both in the domestic and international markets: green propolis, produced in southeast and Central Brazil, and red propolis, from the northeast mangroves. The former contains resin from Baccharis dracunculifolia and the latter contains resins from Dalbergia ecastapyllum. Artepillin c, from Brazilian green propolis, is one the two propolis constituents most studied for their biological properties. Red propolis contains chiefly chalcones, isoflavones and pterocarpans. Other types of Brazilian honey bee propolis have been characterized: a) green propolis, derived from Mimosa tenuiflora, produced in dry forests from the northeast semi-arid; dark propolis from northeast; b) black propolis from the Amazonian region, containing resin derived from Clusia species; c) yellow propolis from the “Pantanal” biome (southwest); d) brown propolis from the south, with varied composition and resins from Araucaria, Baccharis and Populus. A propolis produced in the Ceará state (northeast) contains triterpenoids and of phenolic substances, mainly flavonoids, such as chalcones, flavanones and flavonols (derivatives of kaempferol, quercetin, isorhametin and myricetin). The propolis extract has high antioxidant activity. Several constituents isolated from Ceará propolis have weak anti-HIV activity (17%-44% inhibition of the reverse transcriptase), while isorhamnetin has moderate activity (57% inhibition).
FAPESP, CNPq

  • University of South Bohemia, Czech Republic
  • Title:Thermal Stability of Onion by-Products in Gluten-Free Bread
  • Time :

Abstract:

This study investigated the effects of the addition of onion waste fractions into gluten-free (GF) bread to promote its health benefits. 5% of the control (C) GF flour blend was replaced with three waste fractions in the form of: fried onion (FO), dried onion (DO) and onion peel (OP). Antioxidant activity, content of flavonols and total polyphenols of breads increased in the following order: C < FO < DO < OP. No differences were observed in sensory analysis. We found that quercetin glycosides, dimers and trimer in OP-bread, determined according to their mass spectra, decomposed during baking and released free quercetin, which points to their thermal instability. Cross-over study revealed that consumption of OP-bread significantly increased (p < 0.05) antioxidant activity of consumers’ blood compared to control bread consumption, indicating good bio availability of flavonols. Results suggest incorporation of OP into GF bread can increase its biological value with satisfactory sensory acceptance. Biography:

1987 – 2005 – meat processing factory Krahulik-MASOZAVOD Krahulci, a.s. in different jobs (Technologist, Production Manager, CEO).2006 until this time – University of South Bohemia in České Budejovice. In my professional life I´m interested in meat technologies and different processing of agricultural raw products.
My publications and talks (selected) Utility models:
Auský, J., Smetana, P., Kadlec, J., Bártová, V., Samková, E., Bárta, J., Pešek, M., Mráz, J., Jirotková, D., Bedrníček, J., Laknerová, I. Nodes, R., Karda, K. (2018). Antioxidant component for enrichment, in particular of bakery or meat or dairy products, and bakery, meat and dairy product enriched with this component. UM Nr. 32058. Auský, J., Smetana, P., Kadlec, J., Bártová, V., Samková, E., Bárta, J., Pešek, M., Mráz, J., Jirotková, D., Bedrníček, J., Laknerová, I. Nodes, R., Karda, K. (2018). Dry mixture containing antioxidants for enrichment, especially of bakery or meat products, and bakery and meat product enriched with this mixture. UM Nr. 31210.

  • Savitribai Phule Pune University, India
  • Title:Production of Hydrophobins from White Rot Fungus Pleurotus Ostreatus
  • Time :

Abstract:

Hydrophobins are small, surface-active, cysteine-rich proteins produced by filamentous fungi. They are able to assemble spontaneously into amphipathic monolayers at hydrophobic-hydrophilic interfaces; they lower the surface tension of medium and stabilize foams. Hydrophobins isolated from GRAS cleared edible mushrooms like Pleurotus ostreatus can be used industrially for various purposes like food foams, biosurfactants, biosensors, flavor stabilizers, pharmaceutical formulations, drug delivery systems etc. In consideration with industrial importance of the protein, the objective of this research work was to improve their process yield. In this study Pleurotus ostreatus was grown in submerged liquid fermentation (SLF) using different media like Potato Dextrose Broth (PDB), Yeast maltose and glucose (YMG), Basal minimal medium (BMM), Schizophyllum commune minimal medium (ScM). Class I Hydrophobin like proteins (HYD-LPs) were precipitated using Trifluroacetic acid (TFA). Among different media used for fermentative growth of P.ostreatus, YMG was found suitable for production of hydrophobins with highest yield of 1.86mg/g of biomass. These purified HYD-LPs produced stable foams with half decay time of 70 min, emulsions produced by these proteins with olive oil were stable for many days (EI 81%) and their amphipathic nature was studied by contact angle (CA) measurement of water on Teflon. HYD-LPs layered on Teflon reduced CA of water by 17.68%. P.ostreatus was also grown in solid state fermentation (SSF) on agro-industrial waste oil cakes of coconut and sesame obtained from local market. Moisture content of SSF process was maintained at 75%. Sesame oil cake gave higher yield of HYD-LPs (3.85 mg/g of biomass). Production in SSF was 2 fold higher than that in SLF. This work underlined the suitability of SSF over SLF for higher production of HYD-LPs. To further improve the productivity of HYD-LPs, media optimization methods are underway using various statistical methods.

  • State University of Maringa, Brazil
  • Title:Evaluation of the Hygroscopic Capacity and Antioxidant Activity of Fruit Flour from the Aiphanes Aculeata Palm
  • Time :

Abstract:

Currently, the development of new foods which have health benefits and with nutritional values has increased. The presence of certain substances such as phenolic compounds present in foods of plant origin, help in the prevention of diseases and can have preventive and curative effects on physiological disorders in humans due to their antioxidant action. Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate the hygroscopic behavior of the flour of the fruit of the palm Aiphanes aculeata, belonging to the family Arecaceae, as well as to evaluate its antioxidant activity. To obtain the flour, the fruit pulp was dried in an oven at 60oC, and then the hygroscopic properties were evaluated for water absorption index (IAA), water solubility index (ISA) and absorption index in oil (IAO). To obtain the hydroalcoholic extracts of the flour, 70% (v/v) ethyl and methyl alcohol were used as extracting agents to evaluate in which solvent there would be the best extraction of the phenolic compounds and the best antioxidant activity by the DPPH test. The antioxidant capacity was expressed as the concentration of antioxidant needed to reduce the initial number of free radicals by 50% (EC50), with values expressed in µg/mL. For the extract obtained with ethanol, the EC50 was obtained of 152.67 ± 31.33 µg/mL whereas for methanol, the EC50 was 210.67 ± 15.96 µg/mL. The hygroscopic properties for the IAA, 3.75 ± 0.62g water/g d.m.; for ISA 51.73 ± 3.20% and for IAO 3.11 ± 0.36g oil/g d.m. In this way, the ethanolic extract obtained a greater efficiency of extraction of the bioactive compounds in relation to the methanolic extract, demonstrating better antioxidant activity and great potential to be applied in the formulations of new products, the results of the hygroscopic properties of the flour showed excellent technological quality.

Biography:

Food Engineer (1996), Master in Chemical Engineering (1999) and PhD in Chemical Engineering (2004). Has Experience in the area of Chemical Engineering, with emphasis on Biochemical Processes and Treatment of Supply water. She is currently a professor in the Food Engineering course at the Department of Food Engineering at the State University of Maringá, Brazil. Advisor in the graduate programs in Food Science and Chemical Engineering.

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