Day1

  • Qingdao Agricultral University, China
  • Title:The distribution and stabilization of lipids in food matrix and thereof gastrointestinal fate and bioavailability of liposoluble nutrients
  • Time :

Abstract:

Numerous liposoluble components have exhibited excellent bioactivities including antioxidant, anti-cancer, anti-inflammation and anti-aging etc.. However, their bioavailability remains rather limited due to their poor stability and solubility, which is calling for sophisticated design of lipophilic nanocarriers and healthier foods. The distribution and stabilization of lipids in food systems, in specific factors including the matrix composition and structure, the dispersibility of lipid fraction, the oil/water interfaces, the interaction between fat particles with matrix, as well as the molecular digestibility of fat and nonfat components significantly affect the food digestion process and lipolysis kinetics, which further determines the gastrointestinal fate of liposoluble nutrients by affecting their molecular stability, colloidal stability, releasing kinetics and absorption rate. The efficacy of new delivery approaches and lipophilic noncarriers was evaluated based on the latest research regarding how to enhance the absorption and bioavailability of liposoluble nutrients.

Biography:

Min Chen works as an asistant professor located at Colledge of Food Science and Engineering in QAU since Dec. 2019. Her research is mainly focused on food colloidal and interfacial structures in relation to the gastrointestinal fate and bioavaibility of food nutrients. She did her PhD in Wageningen University (2012-2016), mainly working on liquid foams and films of casein micelle dispersions. Afterwards, she continuted with a postdoc project on oil/water interfaces of biomimetic milk fat globules. You can reach her via email 201901260@qau.edu.cn, phone number 15263043871 or postal address (No.700, Changcheng Road, Chengyang district, Qingdao, China).

  • University of Duhok, Iraq
  • Title:Distribution of total carbonate and iron oxides on catena at Duhok Governorate, Kurdistan Region, Iraq
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Abstract:

The study area located at Zawita location, Duhok province, Kurdistan region, Iraq. Five pedons were digging on catena depending on the slope degree and slope aspects. Samples were air-dried, ground, and sieved using (2) mm sieve, in order to be used for physicochemical analysis. The soil texture varied from clay loam to sandy loam in the surface horizons of all pedons and became finer from the summit to foot slope in the south aspect, in contrast at the north aspect soil texture became coarser from the summit to foot slope). Study soils were less development and less differentiation of soil horizons in pedons at the summit and back slope in contrast to it at the foot slope of catena and were slightly alkaline nonsaline soils. Soil organic matter in the north aspect was more than it in the south aspect. CEC in all horizons for pedon (1) at the summit was high value when compared with it for pedons at the back slope and foot slope. Studied soils consider as calcareous that have a high content of carbonate minerals as a result of the calcification pedogenic process in turn these soils have a high buffering capacity. Total carbonate at the summit, was less amount, in the surface horizon (Ah) then was gradually increased in the subsurface horizon (Bc) after that uniformity increased of carbonate distribution in soil horizons (C1st) and (C2k), whereas was decreased in surface horizons at the back slope at both aspects but in north aspect was less than it at south aspect. In surface horizons, at foot slope in both directions, total carbonate was decreased, whereas the vertical distribution indicated increasing it towards deep horizons of pedons at foot slope. Iron oxides in soil samples were fluctuated between increase and decrease with the exception of pedon (4) at the back slope in the south aspect. Part of the iron oxides was translocation downslope with runoff water and adds it to iron oxides at the foot slope and a considerable amount of it was present in the study location that is causing the change in soil color.

  • University of Science and Technology of Lille ,France
  • Title:Effects of the process parameters on container filling
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Abstract:

The filling of a container with a free surface jet is an important step in many industries, such as the pharmaceutical or food industries. This process consists in delivering a given quantity of material in the shortest possible time. One of the challenges is to control the flow pattern to avoid overdosing, inclusion of air bubbles or the absence of flatness of the deposit’s free surface. This problem is even more accurate for semi-solid fluids, also known as yield stress fluid or viscoplastic fluids, which generate specific flow forms, particularly in relation to the presence of a yield stress.
In this paper, we propose to identify the different patterns, their characteristics and the effects of process parameters like the average velocity in the injection nozzle, the height between the nozzle and the bottom of the container, called “dosing height”, the nozzle diameter, the average velocity, the injected volume and the container width. These process parameters are the main ways to control industrial processes, since they are adaptable for a given material.
For this purpose, an experimental approach where the injection flows are visualized with a model yields stress fluid. The fluids used allow modulating the rheological properties of semi-solid products, such as yield stress, viscosity and shear-thinning. In addition, the experimental observations are compared to the numerical modelling of these flows by implementing an anelastic Hershel-Bulkley behavior to represent the rheological parameters.
The results show the main effects at work in the conditioning process, such as inertial, viscous, plastic and gravity. The flow patterns as well as the mapping of transitions between them are discussed in terms of the previously mentioned process parameters. The transitions are discussed in terms of the conservation of the mechanical energy of the jet and dimensionless numbers evaluating the ratio of the forces governing the physical phenomenon.

Biography:

I passed my master’s degree of Research: Fluid Mechanics, in the University of Science and Technology of Lille, France (2019). I was hired by Fromageries Bel SA like Process Engineer. Thanks to several month of experience, I began a PhD in partnership with Fromageries Bel SA and the Laboratoire Rhéologie et Procédés (2020). The topic of the PhD is “Modélisations expérimentale et numérique des écoulements pour le conditionnement des fluids alimentaires”.

  • University of Sao Paulo, Brazil
  • Title:A novel approach in sugarcane juice processing
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Abstract:

Sugarcane juice is a nutritious, energetic and popular drink in Brazil. For its processing, the
use of supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) technology as an intervention potentially capable
of rendering high quality products can be considered. This study was undertaken to evaluate
the impact of mild temperatures combined with SC-CO2 on the physicochemical parameters,
color, enzymic inactivation, and microbial reduction in cane juice. Pressures (P) in the range
of 74 to 351 bar, temperatures (T) between 33 and 67 ºC, and dwell times (t) varying from 20
to 70 min were tested in a central composite rotatable design. Seventeen trials were performed.
The pH and soluble solids in the raw cane juice ranged widely (pH 4.6–6.0 / 17.3–25.3 ºBrix).
In the processed juice, variations were 4.4–6.6 and 17.2–25.0 ºBrix. The total color difference
(TCD) between raw and processed juice varied from 2.3 and 12.3. The percentages of
polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and peroxidase (POD) reduction ranged from 1.7 to 74.3%, and
between 0.3 and 51.2, respectively. The log reduction of mesophiles, molds and yeasts, and
lactic bacteria varied from (0 to 4), (0.2 to 3.7) and (0 to 1.9), respectively. Salmonella spp.
counts in the raw juice reached 2.2 logCFU/mL, and it was not detected in the processed juice.
As for the thermotolerant coliforms, counts attained 5.2 logCFU/mL, and log reductions varied
from 0.3 and 2.5. The analysis of effects (p ≤ 0.1) pointed out that the interaction between T
and t (T/t) had a significant effect on mesophiles, molds and yeasts log reduction, pH variation,
and PPO reduction. As for the lactic bacteria reduction, T, P/t and T/t played a significant
effect. P, T, t and T/t had a significant effect on the TDC. The combination of mild temperatures
and SC-CO2 can be potentially used for cane juice preservation.

Biography:

Rodrigo Petrus is an associate professor in the Food Engineering Department at the University
of Sao Paulo in Brazil. He holds degrees in Food Engineering and Ph.D. in Food Technology.
He has worked as a research fellow in the High Pressure Processing Validation Center at
Cornell AgriTech/USA. His field of investigation includes hurdle technology applied to liquid
food processing and stability. Dr. Petrus currently serves as a scientific director in the Food
Engineers Brazilian Association (ABEA-SP).

  • International Hellenic University, Greece
  • Title:Microbiota profile analysis of the Mediterranean mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis) from Northern Aegean Sea (Greece) culture areas, based on a 16SrDNA Next Generation Sequencing approach.
  • Time :

Abstract:

Mediterranean mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) (Lamarck, 1819), due to their nutritional mechanisms which involve filtering huge amounts of water, are affected by seawater pollution and can host microbial diversity of environmental origin as well as pathogenic bacteria, which must be constantly monitored. In this study, we applied a Next Generation Sequencing marker gene (16SrDNA) approach for the characterization of the M. galloprovincialis microbiota, collected from mussel farms in the region of Thermaikos gulf, Northern Aegean Sea, Greece. The collection of samples was carried out during the winter months (December 2021 – February 2022), in specific farm zones (Chalastra, Makrigialos), by the official Veterinary service following the appropriate protocol. Totally twelve samples were collected from a 3-8 meters depth, where the temperature was also measured, and within four hours they were transferred to the Veterinary Center of Thessaloniki. 10-12 mussels were selected from each sample and the selected ones had to be alive, adult and of similar size. Then, their shell was opened with a sterile knife, the content (flesh and liquid) was placed in stomacher bags and homogenized for 2 minutes, using the Stomacher device. A microbiological test was also performed using the Most Probable Number (MPN) method for the enumeration of Escherichia coli (according to ISO 16649-3: 2005) and the presence of Salmonella sp. (isolation method using RVS broth and XLD agar). DNA isolation with the DNeasy PowerFood Microbial Kit and amplification of whole 16SrRNA gene ( ̴1500 bp) was conducted with locus specific primers (27F & 1492R), where each sample was marked with a different barcode. Libraries were constructed according to the 16S barcoding kit (Oxford Nanopore Technologies), after pooling all barcodes, for targeted amplicon sequencing. Raw data were base called with algorithms implemented in GUPPY software (Oxford Nanopore Technologies), where reads were demultiplexed according to the used barcodes. Clean sequences were obtained after trimming of barcodes, adapter and primer sequences. Subsequently, they were subjected to EPI2ME Fastq 16S cloud-based bioinformatics workflow (Oxford Nanopore Technologies) for taxonomic classification. The results obtained, showed statistically significant differences between the two sampling regions. More specific, in Makrigialos region the five most abundant genera were Anaplasma (20.9%), Mycoplasma (7.6%), Polaribacter (3.1%), Ruegeria (2.5%) and Rubritalea (1.7%), whereas in Chalastra region the respective ones were Mycoplasma (10.6%), Pseudomonas (3.7%), Mariniblastus (3.4%), Legionella (2.9%) and Rubritalea (2.2%). We hypothesize that different environments generate conditions for specific microorganism growth, reducing competition and favoring the selection of certain genera.

Biography:

My name is Imsiridou Anastasia and I was born in Thessaloniki, Greece, on January 29th 1969. I have a diploma of Biology from the School of Sciences, of the Department of Biology, of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki. I have a PhD in the Sector of Genetics, Development and Molecular Biology, of the Department of Biology, of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki with title “Study of the genetic structure of Greek Leuciscus cephalus (L.) populations”. Part of my PhD thesis was held in Centre d’ Analyse Moléculaire de la Biodiversité of the Université Claude Bernard (Lyon, France) with an ERASMUS scholarship. I had been a post-doctoral researcher in the Institute for Systems Informatics and Safety of Joint Research Center, where I worked on a Web based database for genetic identification of stocks of commercially important fish species (Ispra, Italy, April 1998 – July 1999). From December 1999 till August 2003, I worked as an Ichthyologist in the Department of Fisheries of the Thesprotia Prefecture (Greece). From 2003 till 2012 I had been an Assistant Professor in the Department of Fisheries and Aquacultures Technology of Alexander Technological Educational Institute of Thessaloniki and from 2012 till 2014 I had been an Associated Professor in the same Department. From 2014 till today I am a Full Professor in the Department of Food Science and Technology of the International Hellenic University. I am the author of twenty-three articles published in referred Journals, four chapters in books and forty-six conference papers. I am also the author of a scientific book with title: Genetic Analysis Techniques – Applications in Food Sector, ISBN 978-960-6706-67-7, Sofia Publications, Thessaloniki, Greece, which has been published recently. My research interests are focused on: population genetics, genetic study of aquatic organisms, genetic identification of aquatic organisms, genetic identification of food products, food fraud detection with molecular analysis techniques.

  • Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil
  • Title:Molecular characterization of the bacterial communities present in sheep's milk and cheese produced in South Brazilian Region via 16S rRNA gene metabarcoding sequencing
  • Time :

Abstract:

Sheep’s milk and cheese represent unexplored reservoirs of microorganisms’ genetic and metabolic diversity. This study aimed to characterize the microbial communities of milk and cheese from sheep of Lacaune breed, produced in the South Region of Brazil. Milk samples (n = 15) from three dairy farms and four types of cheese (fresh, colonial, feta-type, and pecorino-type; n = 20) were subjected to partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Streptococcus spp. and Lactobacillus spp. were the dominant taxa (core microbiota) of cheeses, while Phyllobacterium spp. and Staphylococcus spp. were the most prevalent genera in milk. Regarding milk samples, no differences in alpha diversity were observed between the analyzed farms. However, beta diversity analysis revealed that milk collected on Farm 1 differed from the others. These differences may be associated with sheep feeding, mammary gland diseases, and the milking practices used. Upon analyzing cheese samples, significant differences in both alpha and beta diversities were observed between the different cheese types, suggesting that processing and maturation conditions are important for shaping cheese microbiota. Notably, other bacterial groups including decomposers and potentially pathogenic microorganisms to humans were observed in some of the analyzed cheeses. This study expands our knowledge of the bacterial composition of sheep’s milk and cheese found in different geographic regions.

Biography:

Research and Innovation Coordinator at the SENAI SC University Center. She holds a degree in Food Technology from the National Service for Industrial Learning in Chapecó (2012), an MBA in Food Safety Management from the National Service for Industrial Learning in Florianópolis (2015), a Master’s in Food Science and Technology from the University of Passo Fundo (2015). She is currently a PhD student in Food Science and Technology at the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS). She has experience as a professor, consultant and researcher in the area of Food Science and Technology, with emphasis on milk and dairy technology, development of new products, consulting for companies in Good Manufacturing Practices, food analysis and implementation of a Good Manufacturing Practices Manual and Standardized Operating Procedure. She has two awards for outstanding teacher in Higher Education at the State Level, four State-level and two National-level awards for innovative product development. She participated in FAPESC NASCER program for pre-incubation of innovative ideas and was awarded 1st place as the best Pitch.

  • University of São Paulo, Brazil
  • Title:Assessment of Mycotoxin Contamination in Peanut- and Corn-Based Products Consumed in São Paulo, Brazil
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Abstract:

In this work, a previously validated analytical methodology was applied for the simultaneous determination of 11 mycotoxins (aflatoxins [AF] B1, B2, G1 and G2, fumonisins [F] B1 and B2, ochratoxin A (OTA), zearalenone (ZEA), T-2 toxin, HT-2 toxin and deoxynivalenol (DON) in food products (peanuts, corn and derivatives) collected in supermarkets in the region of Pirassununga, São Paulo, Brazil. Analyses were performed by liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), using isotopic standards of mycotoxins. Analytical standards from AFB1, AFB2, AFG1, AFG2, FB1, FB2, OTA, DON, T-2, HT-2 and ZEA (Sigma-Aldrich, Brazil) were used, as well as isotopically labeled standards [13C17]-AFB1, [13C34]-FB1, [13C20]-OTA, [13C18]-ZEA and [13C15]-DON (Romer Labs, Austria), available in the laboratory. Among 61 samples analyzed, 32 had detectable concentrations of at least one mycotoxin, and among the 11 mycotoxins studied, 5 were detected, namely: AFB1, FB1, FB2, ZEA, T-2 and HT-2 toxins. However, only corn kernel samples exceeded the tolerance limit established by Brazilian regulations. The probable daily intake (PDI) for corn products exceeded the values of tolerable daily intake (TDI) for FB1 and FB2 of 2.0 μg/kg bw/day established by the World Health Organization (WHO), indicating that there is a possibility of significant risk to Brazilian public health arising from exposure to the mycotoxins studied. This survey indicated that the occurrence of fumonisins in corn-based products sold in the region of Pirassununga is high, highlighting the importance of preventive actions to avoid risks to consumers, as well as the need for specific legislation and prevention of fungal development in all the product manufacturing steps, as well as during the harvesting and storage of the grain. The higher PDI value for fumonisins than the TDI in most corn-based products warrants concern on the possible health risks related to consumption of these types of foods by the population in the studied area.

Biography:

Carlos A. F. Oliveira is a professor of Food Hygiene and Toxicology at the Department of Food Engineering, School of Animal Science and Food Engineering of the University of São Paulo (USP), Brazil. He has been working in the Food Mycotoxicology area since the 1980´s and is very experienced in coordinating and participating in national and international collaborative projects. His current research interests are focused on analysis of mycotoxins in foods and feed by advanced LC-MS/MS techniques, decontamination strategies for mycotoxins, human and animal biomonitoring studies, and risk assessment evaluations of dietary mycotoxins.

  • Universiti Teknologi MARA, Malaysia
  • Title:Data on transcriptome analysis from mesocarp tissue of mango Mangifera indica ‘Chokanan’ fruits
  • Time :

Abstract:

Mangoes comes in different sizes and consumer are often favour those with bigger,
fleshy mango. Many genes are plays an important role in determining the growth, final size
and shapes of the mango. To further understand the roles of genes that play roles in fruit
development, a de novo transcriptomic analysis was performed at two stages of fruit
development; immature and ripening stage, using Illumina HiSeq 4000 platform with 30x
sequencing coverage. A total of approximately 128 Gb of clean nucleotides was obtained
from 130 Gb of raw nucletides sequenced from four fruit mesocarp of both time points. The
raw and clean data were deposited into National Center for Biotechnology Information
(NCBI) Sequence Read Archive (SRA) database with accession number PRJNA803945.

Biography:

Siti is a senior lecturer in one of the top universities in Malaysia. She received her Bachelor
Degree (Honors) in Biotechnology from Malaysia top university; Universiti of Malaya and
pursued her Master Degree in Plant Biotechnology in National University of Malaysia. She
had then awarded a scholarship by Malaysia Ministry of Education to pursue her Doctorate in
Biological Sciences in University of Auckland, New Zealand, which her research was
focusing on apple fruit development studies involving tissue culture and gene expression
studies. After her graduation, she has been appointed as Senior Lecturer in UiTM. Apart from
teaching and supervising undergraduates and postgraduates, she is also actively involved in
research, reviewing research articles, had been invited to review a science encyclopedia by
Elsevier Inc., writing a reference book for undergraduate students, writing book chapters,
journals and review articles. She had as well won medals in several teaching innovations
competitions. Most of her publications are accepted in high impact journals where they were
indexed in Web of Science (WoS) and Scopus. Her interest in research has been increasingly
developed when she won and led a Fundamental Research Grant Scheme (FRGS) project
with her team; a competitive research grant award by Malaysian Government. She had also
awarded as Professional Technologist from Malaysian Board of Technologist (MBOT). She
is very keen and continuously looking forward to create international research network with
other researchers worldwide.

  • University of Osnabrück, Germany
  • Title:Diabetogenic impact of exosomal microRNAs of pasteurized cow milk
  • Time :

Abstract:

Consumption of pasteurized cow milk is a novel behavior of humans. Pasteurization of milk, a
gentle thermal processing, was introduced with the intention to reduce pathogenic bacterial
growth butto protect valuable bioactive ingredients of milk. In contrast to ultraheat treatment
(UHT), pasteurization protects bovine milk exosomes (MEX) and their bioactive microRNA
(miR) cargo. Translational evidence implicates that human MEX miRs promote pancreatic
beta-cell growth and mTORC1 activation associated with reduced glucose-stimulated insulin
secretion (GSIS). Human MEX miR signaling terminates after weaning associated with a
decrease in mTORC1 and increase in AMPK activity enhancing GSIS. There is critical concern
that continued intake of bovine MEX miRs promote beta-cell de-differentiation back to the
postnatal state thereby enhancing beta-cell endoplasmic reticulum stress with apoptosis
resulting in type 2 diabetes mellitus. MEX miRs of cow milk are a health hazard and have to
be eliminated from the human food chain.

Biography:

Medical studies at the University of Münster. Postdoctoral fellowship at the Cardiovascular
Research Institute, University of California, San Francisco. Clinical specialization in
Dermatology at the University of Düsseldorf. Felix-Hoppe-Seyler-Price 1989 of the German
Society for Laboratory Medicine. Since 1991 senior lecturer and professor at the Department
of Dermatology, Environmental Medicine and Health Theory, University of Osnabrück.
Research interests: Lipoprotein, epidermal and sebaceous lipid metabolism, retinoid biology,
diabetes mellitus, milk miR signaling in health and disease

  • Autonomous University of Queretaro, Mexico
  • Title:Ohmic heating pretreatment to produce black garlic
  • Time :

Abstract:

The consumption of black garlic (BG) has been attributed to various biological functions with benefits to human health; such as antioxidant, anti-allergic, anti-diabetic, anti-inflammatory and anti-carcinogenic effects. BG is a product derived from the thermal process of fresh garlic, reducing its characteristic pungent odor and taste considerably due to the organosulfur compounds that fresh garlic has. Common processing to obtain BG is carried out under controlled conditions of high temperature (60 – 90°C) and relative humidity (55 – 90%) where the Maillard reaction is promoted. The necessary period to obtain a quality product can vary from 30 to 90 days, depending on the variety of bulb, size, content of fructans and reducing sugars. One of the alternatives to reduce the process time is applying ohmic heating (OH) as pre-treatment; this causes the hydrolysis of fructans, obtaining free fructose, a reducing sugar that is degraded during storage in conditions of 70°C/94% RH through the Maillard reaction, accelerating the formation of compounds responsible for the flavor and color of garlic black, compared to black garlic without pretreatment. The characteristic color of black garlic from bulbs treated with ohmic heating (OH-BG) was obtained in 12 days; while in untreated bulbs (CT-BG) 30 days were needed. The content of 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde (HMF) was 3.6 times higher in OH-BG than in CT-BG. Polyphenol content and antioxidant capacity did not show statistical differences between CT-BG and OH-BG, but their levels were higher than a commercial sample. Both products (OH-BG and CT-BG) presented high °Brix values (36.8 and 31.6 °Bx, respectively) which are perceived as sweet taste, and also have a chewy consistency and pleasant aroma, achieving excellent sensory acceptance. These results highlight the potential of ohmic heating pretreatment in reducing the time to obtain good quality BG.

Biography:

My name is Ma. Estela Vázquez-Barrios, I’m Chemicopharmacobiologist, I have a master’s degree in Food Science and Technology and a Ph in food sciences. I am a full-time category VII professor at the Faculty of Chemistry; and member of the research group “Emerging Technologies to promote Food Security” at the Autonomous University of Querétaro (UAQ). I am an active reviewer of scientific articles in the journal Horticulturae. I’m professor from 1999 – 2013 at ITESM and from 1998 to date at UAQ where she also conducted research in the Food Science and Technology Program at the Faculty of Chemistry from 2013 to date. The main line of work deals with the application of technologies for the use of horticultural products. I have trained human resources at the undergraduate level (8), postgraduate (3 master’s) and I participate and advise doctoral projects (6). The results of the investigations have been presented at national and international conferences and I am the author (5), co-author (15) of articles published in national and international journals. I have agreements with food companies for advice and development of new products based on agro-industrial waste, for its use (new uses), contributing to the reduction of post-harvest losses of fruits and vegetables to obtain value-added ingredients.
I have collaboration with the University of Almeria; with the Food Science Research Institute in Spain and with the Application of technologies for the processing of garlic bulbs (onion bulbs, black garlic).

  • Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation, Brazil
  • Title:Sweetpotato as a Tool for Biofortification in Brazil
  • Time :

Abstract:

Orange sweetpotato has been used as a source of betacarotene in different countries and more recently, in Brazil. Brazilians are used to consume sweetpotato roots with white flesh, purple or white skin and high dry matter content. The initial introduction of cultivars with traits different from the usual, showed to be a challenge in some Brazilian regions. This work will present the efforts required to identify alternatives to introduce the consumption of orange flesh sweetpotatoes on the Brazilian diet. The work started in 2008 and included initiatives on food processing, to enable better acceptance by consumers. Additionally, it also included the development of new cultivars that met the minimum growers’ agronomic requirements and also good nutritional characteristics. These efforts included experiments in different municipalities to assure the stability of the sweetpotato genotype selected. In 2021 a new sweetpotato genotype was released and promise to collaborate even more with the expansion of the biofortification program in the country. This initiative was only successful due to the development of a very broad and committed network that included producers, consumers, public and private companies and universities.

Biography:

I am an agronomist with a PhD in plant pathology from Oklahoma State University. After four years on the private sector working with maize breeding, I joined the Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation (EMBRAPA) to work with sweetpotatoes. Along these years I´ve been developing alternatives to improve the acceptance of orange flesh sweetpotatoes in the country and identifying key issues on sweetpotato production in Brazil.

  • Zahedan University of Medical Sciences, Iran
  • Title:The Effects of Magnesium Supplementation on Serum Level of Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) and Depression Status in Patients with Depression
  • Time :

Abstract:

Objective
Recent researches suggest that there is a relationship between the pathogenesis of depression and serum Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) levels. Therefore, the purpose of this clinical trial was to determine effect of magnesium supplementation on serum Level of BDNF, magnesium and depression status in patients with depression.

Methods
A double blind randomized clinical trial was conducted on 46 depressed subjects. The participants were randomly allocated into the magnesium (MG) and the placebo (PG) group and received 500 mg magnesium and placebo daily for 8 weeks. Beck’s test was conducted and blood samples were taken at baseline and after the intervention period for analysis of serum magnesium and BDNF.

Results
No significant differences were observed in assessed variables between the two groups at the baseline. At the end of intervention, supplementation with magnesium oxide had a significant effect on Beck’s test (P = 0.01) and serum magnesium (P = 0.001), but had no significant effect on BDNF levels (P = 0.507) between the two groups.

Conclusions
Daily intake of 500 mg magnesium oxide for at least 8 weeks improved Beck’s test score and serum magnesium in depressed patients, but had no significant effect on BDNF levels between the two groups, Which Further research is recommended.
Keywords: BDNF; Beck’s test; Brain derived neurotrophic factor; Depression; Magnesium; Randomized clinical trial.

Biography:

This is Dr. Mansour Shahraki (Ph.D), Professor of Nutrition. I am an academic member at Department of Nutrition and the member of “Children and Adolescents , Health Research Center, Research Institute of Cellular and Molecular Science in Infectious Disease’, Medical Faculty, Zahedan University of Medical Sciences , Zahedan, Iran. I am also the membership of the committee “Iranian Nutrition Scientific Board (Boardman)” & the membership of Iranian Nutrition Society (ATA).

  • Armidale Livestock Industries Centre, Australia
  • Title:Live Animal and Carcass Assessments of Traits in Beef Cattle Using 3D Imaging
  • Time :

Abstract:
This study reports on 3-dimensional (3D) imaging technologies that reconstruct the shape of both live cattle and beef carcasses. The 3D imaging technology for live cattle assesses hip height (cm), fat depth (mm) and muscle score and for beef carcasses assesses lean meat yield (%). A supervised machine learning approach using non-linear regression algorithms have been developed to assess the traits on both live cattle and carcasses. To develop the algorithms observed values are compared with the 3D assessments. The observed live cattle assessments are measured hip height, ultrasound scanning of fat depth and objective assessment of muscle score by accredited assessors; and the observed carcass assessment is computed tomography (CT) scanning of boned out primals to estimate lean and fat tissue. Cognitive perception of humans supports the view that assessors leverage shape rather than distance (e.g., when ascertaining a visual muscle score of beef cattle). Therefore, it is advantageous to represent the body shape beyond 2D and leverage 3D shape representations as curvature, which is one of the core novelties of the research. An example of predicting carcass traits from live cattle assessments before slaughter will be presented.

Biography:
Dr Malcolm McPhee began working for NSW Department of Primary Industries in November 1991 at the Elizabeth Macarthur Agricultural Institute within the Nutrition and Physiology Laboratory, Camden, Australia. He was transferred to Armidale, NSW, Australia in 1997 to work within the Beef Industry Centre of Excellence and on projects within the Beef Cooperative Research Centre. Dr McPhee’s research is focussed on assisting beef producers ‘meet market specifications’ and improve productivity and profitability. Drawing on over nearly three decades of scientific research Dr McPhee has been instrumental in the development of 4 major decision support tools for sheep and cattle producers. More recently, Dr McPhee has worked with a team of scientists in the development of the BeefSpecs calculator (http://beefspecs.agriculture.nsw.gov.au/) and BeefSpecs drafting tool (http://beefspecs.agriculture.nsw.gov.au/drafting/). The work conducted on developing BeefSpecs has led to the development of 3D imaging technologies in collaboration with the University of Technology, Sydney, Australia with funding from Meat and Livestock Australia to objectively assess hip height, P8 fat, and muscle score on live cattle. Dr McPhee has a Bachelor of Applied Science in mathematics majoring in statistics from the University of Technology, Sydney, Australia, Masters Degree in statistics from the University of Wollongong, Wollongong, Australia and a PhD in Nutritional Biology, majoring in Animal Systems modelling, from the University of California, Davis, California, USA. Dr McPhee is committed to developing technologies and decision support tools to improve the productivity and profitability of agricultural industries.

  • Federal University of Goias, Brazil
  • Title:Better Fatty Acids Profile in Fillets of Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis Nloticus) Supplemented with Fish Oil
  • Time :

Abstract:

Fish is an important source of high-quality; readily digested protein in the human diet, a rich source of minerals and vitamins, and it contains lipids that are recognized as having high nutritional value. Tilapia has become the most popular aquaculture product in the world; with the Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) considered the most desirable species. The fatty acid (FA) composition of freshwater fish is characterized by high levels of n-6 PUFAs, mainly linoleic acid (C18:2n-6). In contrast, marine plankton and the fish that feed on them present low levels of n-6 PUFAs and a predominance of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, C20:5n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C22:6n-3). Marine fish oil is rich in n-3 long-chain PUFAs (LC-PUFAs). Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are biologically important compounds that confer protection against diseases, including cardiovascular diseases and rheumatoid arthritis. They also display anticarcinogenic properties and support the immune system and brain functions. Dietary supplementation with marine fish oil tends to increase the concentration of n-3 LC-PUFAs in the muscular tissue of the freshwater fish. An increase in levels of the n-3 series of FAs was observed in tilapia fillets that were supplemented. Modern human diets have ratios of n-6/n-3 ranging from 15:1 to 20:1, in contrast to an ideal range of 1:1 to 4:1. The high concentration of EPA and DHA in the fish oil was reflected in nutritionally satisfactory ratios of n-6/n-3 in tilapia fillets. Using a good marketing strategy it is possible to add economic value to the fillet making improved profitability.

Biography:

Graduated in Veterinary Medicine from the Federal University of Minas Gerais (1989), Master in Veterinary Medicine from the Federal University of Minas Gerais (1993) and doctorate in Food Science from the State University of Campinas (2004). He is currently an associate professor at the Federal University of Goias. He has experience in the Inspection and Technology of Meat and Meat Products and Food Science and Technology, with an emphasis on Evaluation and Quality Control of Meat and Meat Products, acting mainly on the following topics: natural antioxidants and fatty acids in meat.

  • University of Lubumbashi, Congo
  • Title:Enzymatic Reactions in the Production of Biomethane from Organic Waste
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Abstract:

Enzymatic reactions refer to organic reactions catalyzed by enzymes. This review aims to enrich the documentation relative to enzymatic reactions occurring during the anaerobic degradation of residual organic substances with emphasis on the structures of organic compounds and reaction mechanisms. This allows to understand the displacement of electrons between electron-rich and electron-poor entities to form new bonds in products. The detailed mechanisms of enzymatic reactions relative to the production of biomethane have not yet been reviewed in the scientific literature. Hence, this review is novel and timely as it discusses the chemical behavior or the reactivity of different functional groups, thereby allowing to better understand the enzymatic catalysis in the transformations of residual proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids into biomethane and fertilizers. Such understanding allows to improve the overall biomethanation efficiency in industrial applications.

Biography:

Topwe Mwene-Mbeja currently works as a professor of organic chemistry at the Department of chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Lubumbashi, D. R. Congo. He received Ph.D. in Organic chemistry at Laval University, Quebec, Canada. He is a member of the association of graduates of Laval University. He is also a member of University of Manitoba Alumni Association, Manitoba, Canada, and a Representative of Lubumbashi University to Canadian Universities. His a researcher at Hydro-Quebec Institute in environment, development and society of the Laval University, Quebec, Canada. Topwe Mwene-Mbeja does research in Medicinal Chemistry, Organometallic Chemistry and Organic Chemistry. His group is interested in the discovery of biologically active natural products possessing properties against cancer. His group is also interested in green chemistry projects related to the prevention of pollution of the environment and sustainable development.

  • Faculty of Sport Sciences, Japan
  • Title:Involvement of Neutrophils in Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage and its Prevention
  • Time :

Abstract:

Neutrophils not only play a critical role in host defense by migrating to the site of infection and producing reactive oxygen species (ROS), but also mediate pathological processes involved in tissue destruction. Therefore, it is important to assess and modulate neutrophil activities. Exhaustive exercise facilitates neutrophil activity, suggesting their involvement with muscle damage [1-4]. However, at that time, we needed to separate neutrophils from whole blood, and great care was needed to do this. Also, it took at least 1 h to adjust a fixed cell concentration of neutrophils for the functional analyses, and some researchers criticized the method, saying that the recovery rate was low and the neutrophil functions were altered from the in vivo environments. Because we observed complex phenomena centered on neutrophils following exercise, some novel technology was required to examine the neutrophil dynamics and functional modulation. Thus, I would like to share some of our research on neutrophils in relation with exercise and muscle damage. I will begin with my early studies on neutrophil functional analyses and a newly developed measurement system [5-7]. Then, some key data about effects of exercise, antioxidant modulation, mechanisms of exercise-induced muscle damage, and possible preventive countermeasures such as functional foods targeting pathogenesis will be described [7-10].

Biography:

Professor ,Cooperative Major in Advanced Health Sciences, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology and Waseda University (PhD course only: 2010-2013); Adjunct Professor, Institute of Biomedical Innovation, School of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Health, Queensland University of Technology, Australia (2013-2014); President, International Society of Exercise and Immunology (ISEI) (2015-2017); Guest Editor, “Exercise and Inflammation” of Antioxidants (2017-2018); and Guest Editor, “Anti-inflammatory and Antioxidant Effects of Dietary Supplementation and Lifestyle factors” of Antioxidants (2019).

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