• Faculty of Sport Sciences, Japan
  • Title:Involvement of Neutrophils in Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage and its Prevention
  • Time :

Abstract:

Neutrophils not only play a critical role in host defense by migrating to the site of infection and producing reactive oxygen species (ROS), but also mediate pathological processes involved in tissue destruction. Therefore, it is important to assess and modulate neutrophil activities. Exhaustive exercise facilitates neutrophil activity, suggesting their involvement with muscle damage [1-4]. However, at that time, we needed to separate neutrophils from whole blood, and great care was needed to do this. Also, it took at least 1 h to adjust a fixed cell concentration of neutrophils for the functional analyses, and some researchers criticized the method, saying that the recovery rate was low and the neutrophil functions were altered from the in vivo environments. Because we observed complex phenomena centered on neutrophils following exercise, some novel technology was required to examine the neutrophil dynamics and functional modulation. Thus, I would like to share some of our research on neutrophils in relation with exercise and muscle damage. I will begin with my early studies on neutrophil functional analyses and a newly developed measurement system [5-7]. Then, some key data about effects of exercise, antioxidant modulation, mechanisms of exercise-induced muscle damage, and possible preventive countermeasures such as functional foods targeting pathogenesis will be described [7-10].

Biography:

Professor ,Cooperative Major in Advanced Health Sciences, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology and Waseda University (PhD course only: 2010-2013); Adjunct Professor, Institute of Biomedical Innovation, School of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Health, Queensland University of Technology, Australia (2013-2014); President, International Society of Exercise and Immunology (ISEI) (2015-2017); Guest Editor, “Exercise and Inflammation” of Antioxidants (2017-2018); and Guest Editor, “Anti-inflammatory and Antioxidant Effects of Dietary Supplementation and Lifestyle factors” of Antioxidants (2019).

  • University of Lubumbashi, Congo
  • Title:Enzymatic Reactions in the Production of Biomethane from Organic Waste
  • Time :

Abstract:

Enzymatic reactions refer to organic reactions catalyzed by enzymes. This review aims to enrich the documentation relative to enzymatic reactions occurring during the anaerobic degradation of residual organic substances with emphasis on the structures of organic compounds and reaction mechanisms. This allows to understand the displacement of electrons between electron-rich and electron-poor entities to form new bonds in products. The detailed mechanisms of enzymatic reactions relative to the production of biomethane have not yet been reviewed in the scientific literature. Hence, this review is novel and timely as it discusses the chemical behavior or the reactivity of different functional groups, thereby allowing to better understand the enzymatic catalysis in the transformations of residual proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids into biomethane and fertilizers. Such understanding allows to improve the overall biomethanation efficiency in industrial applications.

Biography:

Topwe Mwene-Mbeja currently works as a professor of organic chemistry at the Department of chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Lubumbashi, D. R. Congo. He received Ph.D. in Organic chemistry at Laval University, Quebec, Canada. He is a member of the association of graduates of Laval University. He is also a member of University of Manitoba Alumni Association, Manitoba, Canada, and a Representative of Lubumbashi University to Canadian Universities. His a researcher at Hydro-Quebec Institute in environment, development and society of the Laval University, Quebec, Canada. Topwe Mwene-Mbeja does research in Medicinal Chemistry, Organometallic Chemistry and Organic Chemistry. His group is interested in the discovery of biologically active natural products possessing properties against cancer. His group is also interested in green chemistry projects related to the prevention of pollution of the environment and sustainable development.

  • Federal University of Goias, Brazil
  • Title:Better Fatty Acids Profile in Fillets of Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis Nloticus) Supplemented with Fish Oil
  • Time :

Abstract:

Fish is an important source of high-quality; readily digested protein in the human diet, a rich source of minerals and vitamins, and it contains lipids that are recognized as having high nutritional value. Tilapia has become the most popular aquaculture product in the world; with the Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) considered the most desirable species. The fatty acid (FA) composition of freshwater fish is characterized by high levels of n-6 PUFAs, mainly linoleic acid (C18:2n-6). In contrast, marine plankton and the fish that feed on them present low levels of n-6 PUFAs and a predominance of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, C20:5n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C22:6n-3). Marine fish oil is rich in n-3 long-chain PUFAs (LC-PUFAs). Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are biologically important compounds that confer protection against diseases, including cardiovascular diseases and rheumatoid arthritis. They also display anticarcinogenic properties and support the immune system and brain functions. Dietary supplementation with marine fish oil tends to increase the concentration of n-3 LC-PUFAs in the muscular tissue of the freshwater fish. An increase in levels of the n-3 series of FAs was observed in tilapia fillets that were supplemented. Modern human diets have ratios of n-6/n-3 ranging from 15:1 to 20:1, in contrast to an ideal range of 1:1 to 4:1. The high concentration of EPA and DHA in the fish oil was reflected in nutritionally satisfactory ratios of n-6/n-3 in tilapia fillets. Using a good marketing strategy it is possible to add economic value to the fillet making improved profitability.

Biography:

Graduated in Veterinary Medicine from the Federal University of Minas Gerais (1989), Master in Veterinary Medicine from the Federal University of Minas Gerais (1993) and doctorate in Food Science from the State University of Campinas (2004). He is currently an associate professor at the Federal University of Goias. He has experience in the Inspection and Technology of Meat and Meat Products and Food Science and Technology, with an emphasis on Evaluation and Quality Control of Meat and Meat Products, acting mainly on the following topics: natural antioxidants and fatty acids in meat.

  • Armidale Livestock Industries Centre, Australia
  • Title:Live Animal and Carcass Assessments of Traits in Beef Cattle Using 3D Imaging
  • Time :

Abstract:
This study reports on 3-dimensional (3D) imaging technologies that reconstruct the shape of both live cattle and beef carcasses. The 3D imaging technology for live cattle assesses hip height (cm), fat depth (mm) and muscle score and for beef carcasses assesses lean meat yield (%). A supervised machine learning approach using non-linear regression algorithms have been developed to assess the traits on both live cattle and carcasses. To develop the algorithms observed values are compared with the 3D assessments. The observed live cattle assessments are measured hip height, ultrasound scanning of fat depth and objective assessment of muscle score by accredited assessors; and the observed carcass assessment is computed tomography (CT) scanning of boned out primals to estimate lean and fat tissue. Cognitive perception of humans supports the view that assessors leverage shape rather than distance (e.g., when ascertaining a visual muscle score of beef cattle). Therefore, it is advantageous to represent the body shape beyond 2D and leverage 3D shape representations as curvature, which is one of the core novelties of the research. An example of predicting carcass traits from live cattle assessments before slaughter will be presented.

Biography:
Dr Malcolm McPhee began working for NSW Department of Primary Industries in November 1991 at the Elizabeth Macarthur Agricultural Institute within the Nutrition and Physiology Laboratory, Camden, Australia. He was transferred to Armidale, NSW, Australia in 1997 to work within the Beef Industry Centre of Excellence and on projects within the Beef Cooperative Research Centre. Dr McPhee’s research is focussed on assisting beef producers ‘meet market specifications’ and improve productivity and profitability. Drawing on over nearly three decades of scientific research Dr McPhee has been instrumental in the development of 4 major decision support tools for sheep and cattle producers. More recently, Dr McPhee has worked with a team of scientists in the development of the BeefSpecs calculator (http://beefspecs.agriculture.nsw.gov.au/) and BeefSpecs drafting tool (http://beefspecs.agriculture.nsw.gov.au/drafting/). The work conducted on developing BeefSpecs has led to the development of 3D imaging technologies in collaboration with the University of Technology, Sydney, Australia with funding from Meat and Livestock Australia to objectively assess hip height, P8 fat, and muscle score on live cattle. Dr McPhee has a Bachelor of Applied Science in mathematics majoring in statistics from the University of Technology, Sydney, Australia, Masters Degree in statistics from the University of Wollongong, Wollongong, Australia and a PhD in Nutritional Biology, majoring in Animal Systems modelling, from the University of California, Davis, California, USA. Dr McPhee is committed to developing technologies and decision support tools to improve the productivity and profitability of agricultural industries.

  • Zahedan University of Medical Sciences, Iran
  • Title:The Effects of Magnesium Supplementation on Serum Level of Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) and Depression Status in Patients with Depression
  • Time :

Abstract:

Objective
Recent researches suggest that there is a relationship between the pathogenesis of depression and serum Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) levels. Therefore, the purpose of this clinical trial was to determine effect of magnesium supplementation on serum Level of BDNF, magnesium and depression status in patients with depression.

Methods
A double blind randomized clinical trial was conducted on 46 depressed subjects. The participants were randomly allocated into the magnesium (MG) and the placebo (PG) group and received 500 mg magnesium and placebo daily for 8 weeks. Beck’s test was conducted and blood samples were taken at baseline and after the intervention period for analysis of serum magnesium and BDNF.

Results
No significant differences were observed in assessed variables between the two groups at the baseline. At the end of intervention, supplementation with magnesium oxide had a significant effect on Beck’s test (P = 0.01) and serum magnesium (P = 0.001), but had no significant effect on BDNF levels (P = 0.507) between the two groups.

Conclusions
Daily intake of 500 mg magnesium oxide for at least 8 weeks improved Beck’s test score and serum magnesium in depressed patients, but had no significant effect on BDNF levels between the two groups, Which Further research is recommended.
Keywords: BDNF; Beck’s test; Brain derived neurotrophic factor; Depression; Magnesium; Randomized clinical trial.

Biography:

This is Dr. Mansour Shahraki (Ph.D), Professor of Nutrition. I am an academic member at Department of Nutrition and the member of “Children and Adolescents , Health Research Center, Research Institute of Cellular and Molecular Science in Infectious Disease’, Medical Faculty, Zahedan University of Medical Sciences , Zahedan, Iran. I am also the membership of the committee “Iranian Nutrition Scientific Board (Boardman)” & the membership of Iranian Nutrition Society (ATA).

  • Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation, Brazil
  • Title:Sweetpotato as a Tool for Biofortification in Brazil
  • Time :

Abstract:

Orange sweetpotato has been used as a source of betacarotene in different countries and more recently, in Brazil. Brazilians are used to consume sweetpotato roots with white flesh, purple or white skin and high dry matter content. The initial introduction of cultivars with traits different from the usual, showed to be a challenge in some Brazilian regions. This work will present the efforts required to identify alternatives to introduce the consumption of orange flesh sweetpotatoes on the Brazilian diet. The work started in 2008 and included initiatives on food processing, to enable better acceptance by consumers. Additionally, it also included the development of new cultivars that met the minimum growers’ agronomic requirements and also good nutritional characteristics. These efforts included experiments in different municipalities to assure the stability of the sweetpotato genotype selected. In 2021 a new sweetpotato genotype was released and promise to collaborate even more with the expansion of the biofortification program in the country. This initiative was only successful due to the development of a very broad and committed network that included producers, consumers, public and private companies and universities.

Biography:

I am an agronomist with a PhD in plant pathology from Oklahoma State University. After four years on the private sector working with maize breeding, I joined the Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation (EMBRAPA) to work with sweetpotatoes. Along these years I´ve been developing alternatives to improve the acceptance of orange flesh sweetpotatoes in the country and identifying key issues on sweetpotato production in Brazil.

  • Autonomous University of Queretaro, Mexico
  • Title:Ohmic heating pretreatment to produce black garlic
  • Time :

Abstract:

The consumption of black garlic (BG) has been attributed to various biological functions with benefits to human health; such as antioxidant, anti-allergic, anti-diabetic, anti-inflammatory and anti-carcinogenic effects. BG is a product derived from the thermal process of fresh garlic, reducing its characteristic pungent odor and taste considerably due to the organosulfur compounds that fresh garlic has. Common processing to obtain BG is carried out under controlled conditions of high temperature (60 – 90°C) and relative humidity (55 – 90%) where the Maillard reaction is promoted. The necessary period to obtain a quality product can vary from 30 to 90 days, depending on the variety of bulb, size, content of fructans and reducing sugars. One of the alternatives to reduce the process time is applying ohmic heating (OH) as pre-treatment; this causes the hydrolysis of fructans, obtaining free fructose, a reducing sugar that is degraded during storage in conditions of 70°C/94% RH through the Maillard reaction, accelerating the formation of compounds responsible for the flavor and color of garlic black, compared to black garlic without pretreatment. The characteristic color of black garlic from bulbs treated with ohmic heating (OH-BG) was obtained in 12 days; while in untreated bulbs (CT-BG) 30 days were needed. The content of 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde (HMF) was 3.6 times higher in OH-BG than in CT-BG. Polyphenol content and antioxidant capacity did not show statistical differences between CT-BG and OH-BG, but their levels were higher than a commercial sample. Both products (OH-BG and CT-BG) presented high °Brix values (36.8 and 31.6 °Bx, respectively) which are perceived as sweet taste, and also have a chewy consistency and pleasant aroma, achieving excellent sensory acceptance. These results highlight the potential of ohmic heating pretreatment in reducing the time to obtain good quality BG.

Biography:

My name is Ma. Estela Vázquez-Barrios, I’m Chemicopharmacobiologist, I have a master’s degree in Food Science and Technology and a Ph in food sciences. I am a full-time category VII professor at the Faculty of Chemistry; and member of the research group “Emerging Technologies to promote Food Security” at the Autonomous University of Querétaro (UAQ). I am an active reviewer of scientific articles in the journal Horticulturae. I’m professor from 1999 – 2013 at ITESM and from 1998 to date at UAQ where she also conducted research in the Food Science and Technology Program at the Faculty of Chemistry from 2013 to date. The main line of work deals with the application of technologies for the use of horticultural products. I have trained human resources at the undergraduate level (8), postgraduate (3 master’s) and I participate and advise doctoral projects (6). The results of the investigations have been presented at national and international conferences and I am the author (5), co-author (15) of articles published in national and international journals. I have agreements with food companies for advice and development of new products based on agro-industrial waste, for its use (new uses), contributing to the reduction of post-harvest losses of fruits and vegetables to obtain value-added ingredients.
I have collaboration with the University of Almeria; with the Food Science Research Institute in Spain and with the Application of technologies for the processing of garlic bulbs (onion bulbs, black garlic).

  • University of Osnabrück, Germany
  • Title:Diabetogenic impact of exosomal microRNAs of pasteurized cow milk
  • Time :

Abstract:

Consumption of pasteurized cow milk is a novel behavior of humans. Pasteurization of milk, a
gentle thermal processing, was introduced with the intention to reduce pathogenic bacterial
growth butto protect valuable bioactive ingredients of milk. In contrast to ultraheat treatment
(UHT), pasteurization protects bovine milk exosomes (MEX) and their bioactive microRNA
(miR) cargo. Translational evidence implicates that human MEX miRs promote pancreatic
beta-cell growth and mTORC1 activation associated with reduced glucose-stimulated insulin
secretion (GSIS). Human MEX miR signaling terminates after weaning associated with a
decrease in mTORC1 and increase in AMPK activity enhancing GSIS. There is critical concern
that continued intake of bovine MEX miRs promote beta-cell de-differentiation back to the
postnatal state thereby enhancing beta-cell endoplasmic reticulum stress with apoptosis
resulting in type 2 diabetes mellitus. MEX miRs of cow milk are a health hazard and have to
be eliminated from the human food chain.

Biography:

Medical studies at the University of Münster. Postdoctoral fellowship at the Cardiovascular
Research Institute, University of California, San Francisco. Clinical specialization in
Dermatology at the University of Düsseldorf. Felix-Hoppe-Seyler-Price 1989 of the German
Society for Laboratory Medicine. Since 1991 senior lecturer and professor at the Department
of Dermatology, Environmental Medicine and Health Theory, University of Osnabrück.
Research interests: Lipoprotein, epidermal and sebaceous lipid metabolism, retinoid biology,
diabetes mellitus, milk miR signaling in health and disease

  • Universiti Teknologi MARA, Malaysia
  • Title:Data on transcriptome analysis from mesocarp tissue of mango Mangifera indica ‘Chokanan’ fruits
  • Time :

Abstract:

Mangoes comes in different sizes and consumer are often favour those with bigger,
fleshy mango. Many genes are plays an important role in determining the growth, final size
and shapes of the mango. To further understand the roles of genes that play roles in fruit
development, a de novo transcriptomic analysis was performed at two stages of fruit
development; immature and ripening stage, using Illumina HiSeq 4000 platform with 30x
sequencing coverage. A total of approximately 128 Gb of clean nucleotides was obtained
from 130 Gb of raw nucletides sequenced from four fruit mesocarp of both time points. The
raw and clean data were deposited into National Center for Biotechnology Information
(NCBI) Sequence Read Archive (SRA) database with accession number PRJNA803945.

Biography:

Siti is a senior lecturer in one of the top universities in Malaysia. She received her Bachelor
Degree (Honors) in Biotechnology from Malaysia top university; Universiti of Malaya and
pursued her Master Degree in Plant Biotechnology in National University of Malaysia. She
had then awarded a scholarship by Malaysia Ministry of Education to pursue her Doctorate in
Biological Sciences in University of Auckland, New Zealand, which her research was
focusing on apple fruit development studies involving tissue culture and gene expression
studies. After her graduation, she has been appointed as Senior Lecturer in UiTM. Apart from
teaching and supervising undergraduates and postgraduates, she is also actively involved in
research, reviewing research articles, had been invited to review a science encyclopedia by
Elsevier Inc., writing a reference book for undergraduate students, writing book chapters,
journals and review articles. She had as well won medals in several teaching innovations
competitions. Most of her publications are accepted in high impact journals where they were
indexed in Web of Science (WoS) and Scopus. Her interest in research has been increasingly
developed when she won and led a Fundamental Research Grant Scheme (FRGS) project
with her team; a competitive research grant award by Malaysian Government. She had also
awarded as Professional Technologist from Malaysian Board of Technologist (MBOT). She
is very keen and continuously looking forward to create international research network with
other researchers worldwide.

  • University of São Paulo, Brazil
  • Title:Assessment of Mycotoxin Contamination in Peanut- and Corn-Based Products Consumed in São Paulo, Brazil
  • Time :

Abstract:

In this work, a previously validated analytical methodology was applied for the simultaneous determination of 11 mycotoxins (aflatoxins [AF] B1, B2, G1 and G2, fumonisins [F] B1 and B2, ochratoxin A (OTA), zearalenone (ZEA), T-2 toxin, HT-2 toxin and deoxynivalenol (DON) in food products (peanuts, corn and derivatives) collected in supermarkets in the region of Pirassununga, São Paulo, Brazil. Analyses were performed by liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), using isotopic standards of mycotoxins. Analytical standards from AFB1, AFB2, AFG1, AFG2, FB1, FB2, OTA, DON, T-2, HT-2 and ZEA (Sigma-Aldrich, Brazil) were used, as well as isotopically labeled standards [13C17]-AFB1, [13C34]-FB1, [13C20]-OTA, [13C18]-ZEA and [13C15]-DON (Romer Labs, Austria), available in the laboratory. Among 61 samples analyzed, 32 had detectable concentrations of at least one mycotoxin, and among the 11 mycotoxins studied, 5 were detected, namely: AFB1, FB1, FB2, ZEA, T-2 and HT-2 toxins. However, only corn kernel samples exceeded the tolerance limit established by Brazilian regulations. The probable daily intake (PDI) for corn products exceeded the values of tolerable daily intake (TDI) for FB1 and FB2 of 2.0 μg/kg bw/day established by the World Health Organization (WHO), indicating that there is a possibility of significant risk to Brazilian public health arising from exposure to the mycotoxins studied. This survey indicated that the occurrence of fumonisins in corn-based products sold in the region of Pirassununga is high, highlighting the importance of preventive actions to avoid risks to consumers, as well as the need for specific legislation and prevention of fungal development in all the product manufacturing steps, as well as during the harvesting and storage of the grain. The higher PDI value for fumonisins than the TDI in most corn-based products warrants concern on the possible health risks related to consumption of these types of foods by the population in the studied area.

Biography:

Carlos A. F. Oliveira is a professor of Food Hygiene and Toxicology at the Department of Food Engineering, School of Animal Science and Food Engineering of the University of São Paulo (USP), Brazil. He has been working in the Food Mycotoxicology area since the 1980´s and is very experienced in coordinating and participating in national and international collaborative projects. His current research interests are focused on analysis of mycotoxins in foods and feed by advanced LC-MS/MS techniques, decontamination strategies for mycotoxins, human and animal biomonitoring studies, and risk assessment evaluations of dietary mycotoxins.

  • Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil
  • Title:Molecular characterization of the bacterial communities present in sheep's milk and cheese produced in South Brazilian Region via 16S rRNA gene metabarcoding sequencing
  • Time :

Abstract:

Sheep’s milk and cheese represent unexplored reservoirs of microorganisms’ genetic and metabolic diversity. This study aimed to characterize the microbial communities of milk and cheese from sheep of Lacaune breed, produced in the South Region of Brazil. Milk samples (n = 15) from three dairy farms and four types of cheese (fresh, colonial, feta-type, and pecorino-type; n = 20) were subjected to partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Streptococcus spp. and Lactobacillus spp. were the dominant taxa (core microbiota) of cheeses, while Phyllobacterium spp. and Staphylococcus spp. were the most prevalent genera in milk. Regarding milk samples, no differences in alpha diversity were observed between the analyzed farms. However, beta diversity analysis revealed that milk collected on Farm 1 differed from the others. These differences may be associated with sheep feeding, mammary gland diseases, and the milking practices used. Upon analyzing cheese samples, significant differences in both alpha and beta diversities were observed between the different cheese types, suggesting that processing and maturation conditions are important for shaping cheese microbiota. Notably, other bacterial groups including decomposers and potentially pathogenic microorganisms to humans were observed in some of the analyzed cheeses. This study expands our knowledge of the bacterial composition of sheep’s milk and cheese found in different geographic regions.

Biography:

Research and Innovation Coordinator at the SENAI SC University Center. She holds a degree in Food Technology from the National Service for Industrial Learning in Chapecó (2012), an MBA in Food Safety Management from the National Service for Industrial Learning in Florianópolis (2015), a Master’s in Food Science and Technology from the University of Passo Fundo (2015). She is currently a PhD student in Food Science and Technology at the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS). She has experience as a professor, consultant and researcher in the area of Food Science and Technology, with emphasis on milk and dairy technology, development of new products, consulting for companies in Good Manufacturing Practices, food analysis and implementation of a Good Manufacturing Practices Manual and Standardized Operating Procedure. She has two awards for outstanding teacher in Higher Education at the State Level, four State-level and two National-level awards for innovative product development. She participated in FAPESC NASCER program for pre-incubation of innovative ideas and was awarded 1st place as the best Pitch.

  • International Hellenic University, Greece
  • Title:Microbiota profile analysis of the Mediterranean mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis) from Northern Aegean Sea (Greece) culture areas, based on a 16SrDNA Next Generation Sequencing approach.
  • Time :

Abstract:

Mediterranean mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) (Lamarck, 1819), due to their nutritional mechanisms which involve filtering huge amounts of water, are affected by seawater pollution and can host microbial diversity of environmental origin as well as pathogenic bacteria, which must be constantly monitored. In this study, we applied a Next Generation Sequencing marker gene (16SrDNA) approach for the characterization of the M. galloprovincialis microbiota, collected from mussel farms in the region of Thermaikos gulf, Northern Aegean Sea, Greece. The collection of samples was carried out during the winter months (December 2021 – February 2022), in specific farm zones (Chalastra, Makrigialos), by the official Veterinary service following the appropriate protocol. Totally twelve samples were collected from a 3-8 meters depth, where the temperature was also measured, and within four hours they were transferred to the Veterinary Center of Thessaloniki. 10-12 mussels were selected from each sample and the selected ones had to be alive, adult and of similar size. Then, their shell was opened with a sterile knife, the content (flesh and liquid) was placed in stomacher bags and homogenized for 2 minutes, using the Stomacher device. A microbiological test was also performed using the Most Probable Number (MPN) method for the enumeration of Escherichia coli (according to ISO 16649-3: 2005) and the presence of Salmonella sp. (isolation method using RVS broth and XLD agar). DNA isolation with the DNeasy PowerFood Microbial Kit and amplification of whole 16SrRNA gene ( ̴1500 bp) was conducted with locus specific primers (27F & 1492R), where each sample was marked with a different barcode. Libraries were constructed according to the 16S barcoding kit (Oxford Nanopore Technologies), after pooling all barcodes, for targeted amplicon sequencing. Raw data were base called with algorithms implemented in GUPPY software (Oxford Nanopore Technologies), where reads were demultiplexed according to the used barcodes. Clean sequences were obtained after trimming of barcodes, adapter and primer sequences. Subsequently, they were subjected to EPI2ME Fastq 16S cloud-based bioinformatics workflow (Oxford Nanopore Technologies) for taxonomic classification. The results obtained, showed statistically significant differences between the two sampling regions. More specific, in Makrigialos region the five most abundant genera were Anaplasma (20.9%), Mycoplasma (7.6%), Polaribacter (3.1%), Ruegeria (2.5%) and Rubritalea (1.7%), whereas in Chalastra region the respective ones were Mycoplasma (10.6%), Pseudomonas (3.7%), Mariniblastus (3.4%), Legionella (2.9%) and Rubritalea (2.2%). We hypothesize that different environments generate conditions for specific microorganism growth, reducing competition and favoring the selection of certain genera.

Biography:

My name is Imsiridou Anastasia and I was born in Thessaloniki, Greece, on January 29th 1969. I have a diploma of Biology from the School of Sciences, of the Department of Biology, of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki. I have a PhD in the Sector of Genetics, Development and Molecular Biology, of the Department of Biology, of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki with title “Study of the genetic structure of Greek Leuciscus cephalus (L.) populations”. Part of my PhD thesis was held in Centre d’ Analyse Moléculaire de la Biodiversité of the Université Claude Bernard (Lyon, France) with an ERASMUS scholarship. I had been a post-doctoral researcher in the Institute for Systems Informatics and Safety of Joint Research Center, where I worked on a Web based database for genetic identification of stocks of commercially important fish species (Ispra, Italy, April 1998 – July 1999). From December 1999 till August 2003, I worked as an Ichthyologist in the Department of Fisheries of the Thesprotia Prefecture (Greece). From 2003 till 2012 I had been an Assistant Professor in the Department of Fisheries and Aquacultures Technology of Alexander Technological Educational Institute of Thessaloniki and from 2012 till 2014 I had been an Associated Professor in the same Department. From 2014 till today I am a Full Professor in the Department of Food Science and Technology of the International Hellenic University. I am the author of twenty-three articles published in referred Journals, four chapters in books and forty-six conference papers. I am also the author of a scientific book with title: Genetic Analysis Techniques – Applications in Food Sector, ISBN 978-960-6706-67-7, Sofia Publications, Thessaloniki, Greece, which has been published recently. My research interests are focused on: population genetics, genetic study of aquatic organisms, genetic identification of aquatic organisms, genetic identification of food products, food fraud detection with molecular analysis techniques.

  • University of Sao Paulo, Brazil
  • Title:A novel approach in sugarcane juice processing
  • Time :

Abstract:

Sugarcane juice is a nutritious, energetic and popular drink in Brazil. For its processing, the
use of supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) technology as an intervention potentially capable
of rendering high quality products can be considered. This study was undertaken to evaluate
the impact of mild temperatures combined with SC-CO2 on the physicochemical parameters,
color, enzymic inactivation, and microbial reduction in cane juice. Pressures (P) in the range
of 74 to 351 bar, temperatures (T) between 33 and 67 ºC, and dwell times (t) varying from 20
to 70 min were tested in a central composite rotatable design. Seventeen trials were performed.
The pH and soluble solids in the raw cane juice ranged widely (pH 4.6–6.0 / 17.3–25.3 ºBrix).
In the processed juice, variations were 4.4–6.6 and 17.2–25.0 ºBrix. The total color difference
(TCD) between raw and processed juice varied from 2.3 and 12.3. The percentages of
polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and peroxidase (POD) reduction ranged from 1.7 to 74.3%, and
between 0.3 and 51.2, respectively. The log reduction of mesophiles, molds and yeasts, and
lactic bacteria varied from (0 to 4), (0.2 to 3.7) and (0 to 1.9), respectively. Salmonella spp.
counts in the raw juice reached 2.2 logCFU/mL, and it was not detected in the processed juice.
As for the thermotolerant coliforms, counts attained 5.2 logCFU/mL, and log reductions varied
from 0.3 and 2.5. The analysis of effects (p ≤ 0.1) pointed out that the interaction between T
and t (T/t) had a significant effect on mesophiles, molds and yeasts log reduction, pH variation,
and PPO reduction. As for the lactic bacteria reduction, T, P/t and T/t played a significant
effect. P, T, t and T/t had a significant effect on the TDC. The combination of mild temperatures
and SC-CO2 can be potentially used for cane juice preservation.

Biography:

Rodrigo Petrus is an associate professor in the Food Engineering Department at the University
of Sao Paulo in Brazil. He holds degrees in Food Engineering and Ph.D. in Food Technology.
He has worked as a research fellow in the High Pressure Processing Validation Center at
Cornell AgriTech/USA. His field of investigation includes hurdle technology applied to liquid
food processing and stability. Dr. Petrus currently serves as a scientific director in the Food
Engineers Brazilian Association (ABEA-SP).

  • University of Science and Technology of Lille ,France
  • Title:Effects of the process parameters on container filling
  • Time :

Abstract:

The filling of a container with a free surface jet is an important step in many industries, such as the pharmaceutical or food industries. This process consists in delivering a given quantity of material in the shortest possible time. One of the challenges is to control the flow pattern to avoid overdosing, inclusion of air bubbles or the absence of flatness of the deposit’s free surface. This problem is even more accurate for semi-solid fluids, also known as yield stress fluid or viscoplastic fluids, which generate specific flow forms, particularly in relation to the presence of a yield stress.
In this paper, we propose to identify the different patterns, their characteristics and the effects of process parameters like the average velocity in the injection nozzle, the height between the nozzle and the bottom of the container, called “dosing height”, the nozzle diameter, the average velocity, the injected volume and the container width. These process parameters are the main ways to control industrial processes, since they are adaptable for a given material.
For this purpose, an experimental approach where the injection flows are visualized with a model yields stress fluid. The fluids used allow modulating the rheological properties of semi-solid products, such as yield stress, viscosity and shear-thinning. In addition, the experimental observations are compared to the numerical modelling of these flows by implementing an anelastic Hershel-Bulkley behavior to represent the rheological parameters.
The results show the main effects at work in the conditioning process, such as inertial, viscous, plastic and gravity. The flow patterns as well as the mapping of transitions between them are discussed in terms of the previously mentioned process parameters. The transitions are discussed in terms of the conservation of the mechanical energy of the jet and dimensionless numbers evaluating the ratio of the forces governing the physical phenomenon.

Biography:

I passed my master’s degree of Research: Fluid Mechanics, in the University of Science and Technology of Lille, France (2019). I was hired by Fromageries Bel SA like Process Engineer. Thanks to several month of experience, I began a PhD in partnership with Fromageries Bel SA and the Laboratoire Rhéologie et Procédés (2020). The topic of the PhD is “Modélisations expérimentale et numérique des écoulements pour le conditionnement des fluids alimentaires”.

  • University of Duhok, Iraq
  • Title:Distribution of total carbonate and iron oxides on catena at Duhok Governorate, Kurdistan Region, Iraq
  • Time :

Abstract:

The study area located at Zawita location, Duhok province, Kurdistan region, Iraq. Five pedons were digging on catena depending on the slope degree and slope aspects. Samples were air-dried, ground, and sieved using (2) mm sieve, in order to be used for physicochemical analysis. The soil texture varied from clay loam to sandy loam in the surface horizons of all pedons and became finer from the summit to foot slope in the south aspect, in contrast at the north aspect soil texture became coarser from the summit to foot slope). Study soils were less development and less differentiation of soil horizons in pedons at the summit and back slope in contrast to it at the foot slope of catena and were slightly alkaline nonsaline soils. Soil organic matter in the north aspect was more than it in the south aspect. CEC in all horizons for pedon (1) at the summit was high value when compared with it for pedons at the back slope and foot slope. Studied soils consider as calcareous that have a high content of carbonate minerals as a result of the calcification pedogenic process in turn these soils have a high buffering capacity. Total carbonate at the summit, was less amount, in the surface horizon (Ah) then was gradually increased in the subsurface horizon (Bc) after that uniformity increased of carbonate distribution in soil horizons (C1st) and (C2k), whereas was decreased in surface horizons at the back slope at both aspects but in north aspect was less than it at south aspect. In surface horizons, at foot slope in both directions, total carbonate was decreased, whereas the vertical distribution indicated increasing it towards deep horizons of pedons at foot slope. Iron oxides in soil samples were fluctuated between increase and decrease with the exception of pedon (4) at the back slope in the south aspect. Part of the iron oxides was translocation downslope with runoff water and adds it to iron oxides at the foot slope and a considerable amount of it was present in the study location that is causing the change in soil color.

  • Qingdao Agricultral University, China
  • Title:The distribution and stabilization of lipids in food matrix and thereof gastrointestinal fate and bioavailability of liposoluble nutrients
  • Time :

Abstract:

Numerous liposoluble components have exhibited excellent bioactivities including antioxidant, anti-cancer, anti-inflammation and anti-aging etc.. However, their bioavailability remains rather limited due to their poor stability and solubility, which is calling for sophisticated design of lipophilic nanocarriers and healthier foods. The distribution and stabilization of lipids in food systems, in specific factors including the matrix composition and structure, the dispersibility of lipid fraction, the oil/water interfaces, the interaction between fat particles with matrix, as well as the molecular digestibility of fat and nonfat components significantly affect the food digestion process and lipolysis kinetics, which further determines the gastrointestinal fate of liposoluble nutrients by affecting their molecular stability, colloidal stability, releasing kinetics and absorption rate. The efficacy of new delivery approaches and lipophilic noncarriers was evaluated based on the latest research regarding how to enhance the absorption and bioavailability of liposoluble nutrients.

Biography:

Min Chen works as an asistant professor located at Colledge of Food Science and Engineering in QAU since Dec. 2019. Her research is mainly focused on food colloidal and interfacial structures in relation to the gastrointestinal fate and bioavaibility of food nutrients. She did her PhD in Wageningen University (2012-2016), mainly working on liquid foams and films of casein micelle dispersions. Afterwards, she continuted with a postdoc project on oil/water interfaces of biomimetic milk fat globules. You can reach her via email 201901260@qau.edu.cn, phone number 15263043871 or postal address (No.700, Changcheng Road, Chengyang district, Qingdao, China).

  • National University of La Pampa, Argentina
  • Title:Brucella suis in Wild Animals and its Implication in Humans
  • Time :

Abstract:

Brucellosis is one of the most common zoonoses, which affects multiple species. Brucella suis is responsible for a substantial proportion of infections in humans. The B. suis biovar 1 infection in cattle is an emerging veterinary an public health problem. Little is known about the presence of B. suis in wild fauna. In Argentina seroprevalence of Brucella sp was reported in fox (Lycalopex gymnocercus), wild boar (Sus scrofa), European hare (Lepus europaeus), armadillos (Chaetophractus villosus) in Buenos Aires, La Pampa and Patagonia province. Brucella suis biotype 1 was isolated from hare in Buenos Aires and La Pampa. It has also been isolated from armadillos in La Pampa. Hares infected with B. suis biovar 1 exhibited typical lesions of the disease. Nevertheless armadillos have not macroscopically observable lesions. However, histology revealed small internal abscesses (1 mm) in the parenchyma of liver and spleen. Under experimental conditions Brucella was isolated from the spleen, liver, mesenteric lymph node, uterus, urine and testicles samples. In Argentina, as in many countries, there are an underestimation and a sub notification of human cases of brucellosis. From 2009 to 2011, 1040 sera from human resulted positive by serology to brucellosis. Blood cultures were perform in some patients, being able to isolate B. suis biovar 1 in 53% of them and B. abortus in 27%. Although the source of infection is unknown in all of these cases. In rural areas armadillos and hare are hunted and consumed, by humans. However until now it is not available evidence indicating that armadillos and hare can transmit brucellosis to domestic animals, humans or other wildlife by direct contact The route of transmission to humans could be the ingestion of contaminated food, products or undercooked meat or by manipulating these animals at the time of extracting their skin and offal. Only careful and systematic monitoring will help to know the impact of wild animals on the transmission of this zoonotic disease.

Biography:

Marta Susana Kin is Deputy Professor and assistant Professor of the Department of Biology and the Department of Natural Resources of the Faculty of Exact and Natural Sciences of the National University of La Pampa (UNLPam), Argentina. He graduated in Biological Sciences from the National University of La Pampa in 1988, and has a PhD in Biology with an outstanding degree from the National University of the South (UNS) – Argentina, in 2015. He has completed an internship at the University of Malaga, Spain. In the research field, his studies focus on the field of zoonotic diseases in wild animals and the taphonomic analysis of vertebrates among others. He has published 29 research articles and participated in conferences and congresses with about 100 abstracts presented. Among other activities she has been advisor in many Thesis and served as a jury in different academic postulations, as well as she has been part of the Evaluation Committee thesis at UNLPam. She has also participated in numerous research projects as a participant, co-director and director

  • University of Campinas, Brazil
  • Title:Mustard Grains, Germination, Phenolic Compounds and Antioxidants: How Can They Interact?
  • Time :

Abstract:

Mustard grains are known for centuries as an important commercially condiment in all of the world with a huge variety of use and applications. Our research group has been studying this promising grain to improve its biological properties. To begin, choosing the best solvent combination to recover phenolic compounds with antioxidant activity potential was encouraged. We reported for the first time an optimization study for recovery of phenolic compounds from mustard grains in order to obtain extracts with better antioxidant properties. Continuing studies, germination was chosen as a natural process due the actual tendency to valorize the spontaneous process and knowing that the germination is an efficient and economical process that promotes dynamic and complex positive changes in bioactive compounds and nutritional quality of grains. The main questions raised in our research were: How could we germinate mustard grains since changes during the process are peculiar for each grain? How germination affects the antioxidant potential and phenolic compounds composition? So, the first step was to analyze different germination parameters correlated with antioxidant potential. Also, to better understand those complex transformations, our research group investigate how the variation of free and insoluble-bound phenolics affected the antioxidant properties of mustard grains when submitted to different germination parameters. The identification of the bioactive compounds by chromatography techniques was also important to the final discussion. Given the positive results obtained, we can conclude that germinated mustard grains have the potential for application as a functional and nutraceutical food.

Biography:

Gabriela is a second year PhD student in Food Science at University of Campinas. She receives her master degree in Food Science at the same University (2019) under supervision of Prof. Dr. Ruann Janser Soares de Castro. The title of her research was “Mustard grains as source of compounds with antioxidant properties: a study based on germination, extraction and identification processes”. Since them, her research focus is on mustard grains germination and their biochemical transformations linked to the functional properties. Gabriela graduated in Food Science at University of São Paulo in 2016 with an exchange period of 11 months in France, Bordeaux at Bordeaux Science Agro with an internship at Science Institute of Vine and Wine (Institut des Sciences de la Vigne et du Vin) for 8 weeks.

  • Cornell University, USA
  • Title: Agricultural and Supply Chain Impacts of the Pandemic, with Special Emphasis on the Dairy Sector
  • Time :

Abstract:

Food supply chains in North America have become remarkably efficient, supplying an unprecedented variety of items at a low cost. The initial stages of the COVID-19 pandemic and the severe restrictions on dining outside the home exposed the risk of a system that assumes predictable sales and highly reliable transportation systems. Despite early fears and disruptions, the food sector, from farm to retailer, has proven to be quite resilient in total, although there is a huge range of impacts on specific businesses. In the main, agricultural production for major commodities continued uninterrupted. Food processors maintained their output and adapted to a very different distribution opportunity. Consumers had no problem finding food, although there may have been disruptions in certain items at any point in time. A common theme in assessing the impacts across the six major food categories that were examined is the growing importance of understanding the whole supply chain. An important but as yet unresolved question is whether the pandemic experience results in a fundamental reassessment of supply chain vulnerabilities and risks that will cause changes in operating practices and strategies. Enhanced and more aggressive protocols related to worker health seem most likely. Insofar as current systems have tended toward a rather high degree of specialization in production and sales, another example might be greater consolidation of firms, diversification of products, and a greater diversity of customers. At the end of the supply chain there are questions about lasting changes in consumer food buying behavior, including more online shopping for basic foods, meal kits, or prepared meals. There might also be heightened interest in shorter supply chains and more local food systems. It is too early to safely anticipate the answers to these questions, but industry surveys and past behavior would suggest that this experience will have some lasting effects and consumer responses will be especially important in driving behavior.

Biography:

Andrew Novakovic served on the faculty of the Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management at Cornell University for 42, until his retirement in 2020. His primary interest has been dairy markets and policy, but he also is broadly interested in agricultural and food policy. Although officially retired, Dr. Novakovic maintains professional activity in teaching, public outreach and scholarship related to his field of expertise. He is an active participant in the International Dairy Federation and currently serves as an elected member of its Scientific and Programme Coordination Committee.

  • University of Cambridge, UK
  • Title:Nutritional and Functional Properties of Some Local Cultivars of Moringa Oleifera
  • Time :

Abstract:

This study was carried out to evaluate the nutrient composition and functional properties of dried Moringa oleifera leaves collected from two different ecological zones in Bangladesh, Joypurhat and Mymensingh. The proximate analysis revealed that M. oleifera leaves were rich in protein content, ranging from (22.99 to 29.36%), and low in fat, from (4.03 to 9.51%), fiber, from (6.00 to 9.60%), and ash, from (8.05 to 10.38%). The vitamin C content of fresh M. oleifera leaves ranged from (187.96 to 278.50 mg/100 g), Ca ranged from (1.322 to 2.645%), P ranged from (0.152 to 0.304 g/100 g), and K ranged from (1.317 to 2.025 g/100g). The functional properties included WAC (158.00-415.00%), FC (28.30-117.65 ml/l,) and FS (333.33-1000 ml/l). Together, these findings indicate that M. oleifera leaves are rich in vital phytonutrients, suggesting a promising balance of food ingredients for human and animal diets.

  • Universidad del Valle, Colombia
  • Title:Exopolysaccharide-Based Edible Coating and Lactic Acid Bacteria with Antifungal Activity Preserved the Postharvest Quality of Cherry Tomato
  • Time :

Abstract:

One of the main causes of cherry tomato postharvest loss are diseases caused by food-contaminating fungi. Currently, the use of fungicides is the main strategy to control the contamination caused by different types of fungi, but these treatments can cause side effects such as environmental contamination, impacts on human health, and the development of resistance by pathogenic strains, which have generated the need to develop new alternatives to replace the use of synthetic chemicals. Edible coatings (ECs) can preserve the quality of this crop and can serve as carriers of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), which have demonstrated inhibitory potential against phytopathogenic fungi. The effectiveness of the LAB strain Lactiplantibacillus plantarum A6 incorporated into an EC based on exopolysaccharide from Weissella confusa JCA4 on the physicochemical and microbiological quality of cherry tomato was evaluated.The fruit were artificially inoculated with the fungi Aspergillus niger, Fusarium sp., and Rhizopus stolonifer to test the antifungal potential of the coating. The physicochemical and microbiological quality of cherry tomato was studied at two storage temperatures to calculate its shelf life.
L. plantarum A6 remained viable both in the solution and on the surface of the fruit after coating, protecting the fruit against two of the three evaluated fungi (Fusarium sp. and Rhizopus stolonifer). The EC controlled weight loss, maintained firmness, and slowed the respiration rate of cherry tomato; the other physicochemical properties and the appearance of the fruit were not negatively affected. EPS composite coating containing L. plantarum A6 as antifungal agent could be a promising industrial treatment to control fungal deterioration and maintain the postharvest quality of tomatoes.

Biography:

Food scientist and engineering degree from Universidad del Valle, Cali – Colombia. He has research experience in applied food research, food microbiology, liquid and solid state fermentation, management of microorganisms for commercial use, flavor and fragrance biotechnology. His main investigation topic is the postharvest technology and decay control of fruits and vegetables with the use of lactic acid bacteria. Currently, he is a research team member engineer of flavor and fragance biotechnology at La Tour S.A. He has participated as ponent in different conferences in food science and flavor technology, and with poster presentations. He has published in food microbiology and food science and technology journals.

  • Tikrit University, Iraq
  • Title:Formulation of Natural Hydrocolloids and Virgin Coconut Oil as Plant-Based Salad Dressing
  • Time :

Abstract:

Salad dressing is traditionally used as a seasoning to enhance the appetite of consumers due to its creamy mouthfeel and special flavour. Consumers are aware about the cholesterol level in egg yolk and fat’s type applied in dressing products. The aim of this study was to produce low fat and eggless salad dressing with virgin coconut oil (VCO). Hydrocolloids included xanthan gum and modified starch were use as independent variables by response surface methodology (RSM) in order to evaluate its impacts on the viscosity, stability, and firmness of the salad dressing. The findings showed that optimum values for the hydrocolloids of xanthan gum and modified starch were 1.56% and 0.10%, respectively and the optimum experimental values were stability 0.33%, texture 1506.5 g, and viscosity 162.25 mpas. The predicted and experimental data of this optimized formulation had no significant (p>0.05) differences which indicated the desired results from this study. The proximate analysis of the optimized formulation were moisture content 47.91, ash 1.91, fibre 1.57, fat 21.97, protein 1.66, carbohydrate 24.98, and caloric values 296.29. The findings of this study were similar to the commercial products which suggested high potential for using optimum values for the hydrocolloids of xanthan gum and modified starch as egg replacer and VCO in salad dressing to improve the quality and the biological functions of the product.

Biography:

Nameer Khairullah Mohammed is assistant professor in Food Science & Technology with over 10 years of experience in food science in addition to food technology and food biochemistry. He formerly worked in Tikrit university, Iraq as lecturer. After graduated from the University Putra Malaysia (UPM), Malaysia in 2018, he specialized in Food Technology in Iraq. He also holds an assistant professor from Tikrit University. His main research areas are oil extractions, microencapsultion, nanoemulsions, and dairy technology. He is author of over 25 peer-reviewed publications and many book chapters and international conferences.

  • Institute of Food Science and Technology, China
  • Title:Effects of very Fast Chilling on the Quality of Fresh Meat
  • Time :

Abstract:

Fresh meat accounts for about 80% of China’s meat consumption. In recent years, affected by African swine fever and other epidemics, fresh meat transportation instead of living animal transportation has become an inevitable choice for the industry. Chilling is an essential process of fresh meat processing. Traditional chilling method takes longer time and cannot guarantee the meat quality before rigor mortis. As a fast chilling technology, very fast chilling can rapidly reduce the central temperature of the meat to −1 °C within 5 h postmortem, but its effect on the quality of fresh meat is unclear. We conducted the experiment to investigate the effect of very fast chilling technology on rigor mortis, freshness, and microbial community composition of meat. The study showed that very fast chilling can effectively inhibit the occurrence of rigor mortis, significantly reduced the total viable counts on the surface of carcasses and the counts of Corynebacterium and Psychrotrophs, as well as the content of total volatile basic nitrogen and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, thus the shelf life was extended. The above results provided the basis for the application of very fast chilling technology and offered technical support for fresh meat transportation.

Biography:

Chengli Hou PhD, Associate Professor, engaged in research on intelligent logistics and fresh meat preservation. The main research areas include: Mechanism of preservation and losses control of fresh meat; Develop new technologies for chilling, ice temperature/super ice temperature storage, active packaging, and logistics.

  • Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Italy
  • Title:Applicability of DNA Traceability along the Entire Wine Production Chain in the Real Case of a Large Italian Cooperative Winery
  • Time :

Abstract:

Wine is frequently reported as one of the most adulterated agro-food products worldwide. Among the traceability methods available, DNA is of particular interest providing the possibility to recognize uniquely the wine production cultivar/cultivars. Several studies carried out in controlled conditions (laboratory level or small production wineries) support the use of DNA in wine traceability, but the situation can change completely when moving from controlled to uncontrolled realities. In the present study, the entire production chain, in a large cooperative Italian winery, was followed, for a monovarietal (Pinot noir PDO) and a polyvarietal (Rosso Oltrepò TGI) production. Results support the feasibility of DNA traceability from grape delivering to the whole fermentation process and through the most common oenological operations as racking and filtration. The application of most aggressive methods (as the thermovinification process) can increase DNA degradation reducing but not hampering the possibility to apply DNA for traceability purposes. A different situation concerns the storage of wine in tanks, despite the controlled temperature and light conditions, or in bottles where DNA degradation continues strongly influencing the possibility to apply traceability.

Biography:

Matteo Busconi, is associate professor of Agricultural Genetics and Ph.D. in molecular biotechnology at the Faculty of Agricultural, Food and Environmental Sciences, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore. He is lecturer, in the same University, for the courses of: Plant Physiology and Genetics; Vegetable Production and Technology; Plant Derived Products; Plant Genomics for Sustainable Agriculture and Grape and Wine Biotechnology. His research activity is mainly based on plant biodiversity, DNA analysis and DNA based traceability along the Agro-food chain. He is the author of over 60 publications in national and international scientific journals and in proceedings of national and international conferences.

  • French National Center for Scientific Research, France.
  • Title:Prediction of Body Fat in Male Sedentary and Athletes from Ultrasound and Anthropometric Measurements Versus DXA
  • Time :

Abstract:

Background: To evaluate the accuracy of body fat percentage (BF%) estimates from a portable, non -traumatizing ultrasound device compared to dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) the reference technique.
Subjects: A total of 63 healthy men aged from 18 to 60 years participated. The patients were recruited according to a wide range of body mass index (BMI) and consequently of total fat mass. We also selected 100 athletes aged from 18 to 30 years from the French National Institute of Sports and Physical Education: 16 boxers, 4 rowers, 5 gymnasts, 6 base ball players, 19 judo players, 10 taekwondo, 7 basketball players, 21 wrestlers, 6 cyclists on track and 6 karate expert.
Methods: Ultrasound measurement (UT) were made with a sonographic US BOX in A-mode from Lecoeur Electronic Co.(Chuelles, France). We selected two preferred anatomical areas: the intra abdominal area which is often associated with metabolic risk factor and the mid- thigh area. Subcutaneous fat was located in a horizontal plane with approximately 45° axis vertebral at umbilical level and at the middle of the knee and the top thigh on anterior side.
BF(kg) and BF% measurements were obtained using a Hologic QDR-4500W (version 11.25; Hologic Bedford, Mass. USA) for the total sample. The DXA technique, which scans the whole body with an X-ray beam at two energy levels (70 and 100 Kev) is a reference method for measurement of fat mass, lean mass and mineral content. e subject lies in a supine position for 7 minutes and radiation exposure is very low.
Results:
The multiple linear regression to produce BF (kg) estimate with ultrasound dimensions on sedentary male is:
BF(kg) estimate = 0.708 BMI + 0.259 WC + 0.108 UTumb – 31.7

R² = 0.97, SEE = 1.7 kg
with BMI = Weight/Height (kg/m²) UTumb: umbilical thickness of fat (left + right)/2 side (mm); WC: waist circumference (cm).
The simplest model including BMI explained 90% of the variation of BF. Adding BMI and waist circumference in the model significantly increased the R² from 90 to 94% and decreased

SEE from 3.1 to 2.4. Moreover addition of ultrasonic measurement at umbilical level significantly increased the R² from 0.94 to 0.97 (P<0.01). The multiple linear regression equation to produce BF estimate with anthropometry and ultrasonic measurements on male athletes is: BF (kg) estimate = -4.99 BMI +0.109 BMI² +0.154 WC +0.627 UTmid-thigh + 46.19 with a concordance correlation of c =0.931. Pearson correlation R²=0.87 and SEE=1.6 kg. Predict BF% = 100 BF(kg) estimated ./ Body mass (kg). A cross-validation study was then performed with this linear regression on 62 male athletes proportionally stratified across the sports. The concordance correlation c =0.931 and SEE=1.61 kg. Conclusions: The use of an ultrasound portable device associated with anthropometric measurements allowed us to estimate %BF with a high level of accuracy according to the reference DXA. This ultrasonic technique can be used in sedentary subjects as well as high level sportsmen.

  • Teaching Public Health Institute, Croatia
  • Title:Importance of Microbiological Media in Microbiological Control of Food
  • Time :

Abstract:

Foodborne diseases interfere with the socio-economic development of society, burdening the health system and damaging the national economy, tourism and trade. The globalization of food production and trade makes the food chain longer, complicating investigations into diseases caused by food poisoning by delaying the possibility of emergency intervention at the site of the problem. The health safety of food, its nutritional value and food safety are inextricably linked. That is important for the advisory and coordinating role of public health institutions in the implementation of health assessments of human health hazards.
Laboratory for preparation of microbiological media (MM) occupies an important role in quality assurance of microbiological results in bacteriological diagnosis. The laboratory is qualified according to the requirements of ISO/IEC 17025 and maintaining the status of accredited laboratory requires continuous care for the qualifications of laboratory and the quality of work performed. Some requirements are: the process of systematically kept records documents, the technical competence of laboratories, the accuracy and reliability of microbiological test results. All this is to ensure quality services in microbiology with parasitology, there by increasing productivity of bacteriological tests and thus the whole system of microbial activity.
It is important for each laboratory to ensure the quality of the results of the measurements, which are carried out using the quality management system. The implementation of risk analysis and activity plan in routine work provides an indicator of the justification of investments in occupational safety measures, ie in preventive and / or corrective measures, all in order to reduce the risk to an acceptable measure.

Biography:

Anita Rakic has completed Ph.D. of Chemical Engineering in Environmental Protection, and passed all the required examinations with excellent achievements of Faculty of Chemistry and Technology of the University of Split. Also, she takes part in scientific meetings, symposiums and workshops which are hers scientific interest. Her scientific interest is the field of microbiological media and sterilisation.

  • University of Copenhagen, Denmark
  • Title:To Target or not to Target in Analytical Food Authentication
  • Time :

Abstract:

Analytical methods that can offer fast, cost-effective and reliable food authenticity testing at several points in the food production and retail chain are urgently requested. Targeted methods still have much to offer but it is increasingly acknowledged that food is a complex matrix and should thus be treated and analyzed by techniques that can embrace this complexity. The use of non-targeted analytical methods in food authentication has therefore rapidly increased during the past decade.
The increasing use of non-targeted analyses across several scientific disciplines has brought together a mixture of analytical traditions and terminologies and terms such as profiling, signature, fingerprinting, analytical marker etc. are inconsistently used. Consequently, the scientific literature on food authentication often includes different approaches and a variety of definitions and nomenclature for both targeted and non-targeted analysis.
While non-targeted fingerprinting methods are still taking the initial steps into the food authenticity community much more work is required to validate and harmonize these methods and the associated data. An essential prerequisite is a common understanding of the analytical principles of targeted versus non-targeted food authentications. Novel definitions and nomenclature of targeted and non-targeted authentication methods will be proposed. Biological, chemical, and microscopy-based examples of targeted and non-targeted approaches will be presented while discussing the associated possibilities and limitations for analytical food authentication.

Biography:

Nicolai Z. Ballin has a PhD in meat and dairy authentication from the University of Copenhagen. He has nearly 20 years of experience from both official control at the Danish Veterinary and Food Administration and research at the European Commission´s research centre (JRC). He is experienced in developing and validating a diverse range of chemical and molecular biology methods for food authentication, and has been responsible for reporting of a large range of official results. Through his involvement in several food fraud cases he has gained an understanding of how food fraud is officially tackled in Europe. More recently he has been interested in the definitions and nomenclature of targeted and non-targeted analytical approaches across the different scientific disciplines.

  • Medical University of Havana, Cuba
  • Title:Waist / Height Index in Children 7 to 11 Years with High Birth Weight and its Relationship with Sex, Age and Diet
  • Time :

Abstract:

Obesity (OB), considered as one of the Non-Transmissible Chronic Diseases, has as its fundamental characteristics that of being prevalent at a global level, increasing in number, affecting developed and developing countries, affecting both genders, and all ages and social groups.
Objective: To identify if high birth weight is a predictive factor (risk factor) for abdominal obesity in children 7 to 11 years old, and its relationship to gender, age and diet. Method: A case-control descriptive study was carried out with children born between January 1992 and December 1995, in order to identify early risk factors (atherosclerotic accelerators) such as abdominal obesity in children aged 7 to 11, and who have a history of macrosomia or high birth weight, as well as their relationship with gender, age and diet.
Results: It was observed that the waist/height value was normal in 60.8% of the study group and in 64.00% in the control group. The difference between groups, gender, and age was not significant (P=.6859). As regards the diet in the study group (macrosomic), there was no significant association between the type of diet and waist circumference/height values, with an_ 2=0.223 and P=.6373 (not significant). In the control group (with normal weight at birth), it was found that there is a significant statistical association between the type of diet and waist circumference/height values. This means that it can be stated, with 95% reliability, that the type of diet is associated with waist/height values.
Conclusions: High birth weight is not a predictive factor (risk factor) for abdominal obesity (increased waist/height index). Gender and age are independent for abdominal obesity (macrosomic and normal weight at birth). The diet in high birth weight children is not related to the index waist-height index, which is not the case in those born with normal weight under the same conditions. The marked increase in abdominal obesity (Waist/height index) in children between 7 and 11 years old in both groups is worrying.

Biography:

Nuris Rodriguez Vargas is a Master in Comprehensive Child Care,Professor at the Medical University of Havana-Cuba, Consultant Professor of the Medical University of Havana-Cuba,Researcher on atherosclerotic risk factors(atherosclerotic accelerators) in children with high birth weight.
I have multiple research published in Cuba, Spain, Barcelona in the ELSEVIER Editorial, among others. For more than 15 years I have been dedicated to this line of Research, having won an award in the forum of Science and Technology in my Country, in addition to presenting work and Conference in other countries such as Rome, Dominican Republic .

  • University of Padova, Italy
  • Title:The Role of New Antioxidant Milk-Derived Bioactive Peptides in Nrf2 Activation
  • Time :

Abstract:

Milk-derived bioactive peptides can improve the treatment of many diseases, behaving as antihypertensive, antimicrobic and antioxidant agents. This study was focused on new peptides evaluated for their antioxidant properties and mechanism of action cell enviroment. Peptide enriched fractions were extracted from fermented milk and purified in order to obtain the sequence of the included bioactive peptides. Twenty-three new peptides were identified and synthesized by solid phase procedure. Their antioxidant properties were analysed in vitro and in a cellular model using Caco-2 cells. Among these peptides, N-15-M, E-11-F, Q-14-R and A-17-E were selected in order to estimate their antioxidant capacity on Caco-2 cells both as protection against oxidative stress and inhibition of ROS production induced by TbOOH. In order to understand the possible action of the peptides on Keap1-Nrf2 pathway, which is involved in the response to oxidative stress, the translocation of Nrf2 from cytosol to the nucleus was taken into account. N-15-M, Q-14-R and A17-E were able to activate the Keap1-Nrf2 system, as shown by the higher amount of Nrf2 found in the nucleus with respect to the control. This modulation led to overexpression and increase of activity of antioxidant enzymes such as TrxR1, GR, NQO1 and SOD1. The interaction of these peptides with Keap1 was also studied through molecular docking analysis. The results confirmed that N-15-M, Q14-R and A-17-E interact with the residues of the Keap1 pocket involved in the binding with Nrf2, acting as disruptor of Keap1-Nrf2 interaction.

Biography:

Federica Tonolo received her master degree summa cum laude in Sanitary Biology in 2016 at University of Padova, Italy. In 2016, she won a European fellowship as part of an FSE project at University of Padova under the supervision of Prof. Maria Pia Rigobello. Currently, she is a third year PhD student in Biomedical Sciences at University of Padova in the same lab. Her major field of interest is related to the antioxidant bioactive peptides derived from food matrices, in particular milk and soy. Up to now (Jan 08, 2020) the scientific production includes 15 publications divided into 8 full papers and 6 meeting communications

  • Beni-Suef University, Egypt
  • Title:Electrochemical Determination of Verapamil Hydrochloride Using Carbon Nanotubes/TiO2 Nanocomposite Based Potentiometric Sensors in Surface Water and Urine Samples
  • Time :

Abstract:

This study aims to apply a current progress on the construction and sense of carbon paste sensors based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs)/ TiO2 nanocomposite for verapamil hydrochloride determination. The role affecting the behavior of ionophore, lipophilic anionic additive as well as plasticizer is discussed carefully. The developed sensors were abbreviated as β-CDCPE and VER-PTCPE. These sensors exhibited excellent Nernstian behavior with linear dynamic ranges of 6.2 × 10-7 – 1.0 × 10-2 and 7.4 × 10-7 – 1.0 × 10-2 mol L-1, detection limits 2.0 × 10-7 and 3.5 × 10-7 mol L-1 and quantification limits 6.6 × 10-7 and 1.1 × 10-6 mol L-1 for β-CDCPE and VER-PTCPE, respectively. The investigated sensors showed adequate selectivity toward the target ion against some inorganic cations, neutral species and Diltiazem hydrochloride (drug with similar structure). The proposed potentiometric sensors were successfully performed for drug determination in pharmaceutical products, spiked surface water and human urine samples with good recovery data (98.46 and 99.06) for β-CDCPE and VER-PTCPE, respectively.

Biography:

I received my BSc, MSc and Ph. D degrees in Analytical Chemistry from Faculty of Science, Beni-Suef University, Egypt. My research is focused on ion-selective electrodes for drug determination and effect of nanomaterials on potentiometric sensors. I am preparing sensors for determination of inorganic compounds in variety real samples as a simple , sensitive, selective and low cost method.

  • University of Warsaw, Poland
  • Title:High Temperature Triggers the Antioxidant Action of Two Two Edible Isothiocyanates: Sulforaphane and Erucin. Effect of Sulfenic Acids and Methylsulfinyl Radicals as Radical Trapping Antioxidants
  • Time :

Abstract:

Sulforaphane (SFN) and erucin (ERN) are isothiocyanates (ITCs) bearing, respectively, methylsulfinyl and methylsulfanyl groups. Their chemopreventive and anticancer activity is attributed to ability to modulate cellular redox status due to induction of Phase 2 cytoprotective enzymes (indirect antioxidant action) but many attempts to connect the bioactivity of ITCs with their radical trapping activity failed. Both ITCs are evolved from their glucosinolates during food processing of Cruciferous vegetables, therefore, we studied antioxidant behaviour of SFN/ERN at elevated temperature in two lipid systems. Neither ERN nor SFN inhibit the oxidation of bulk linolenic acid (below 100C) but both ITCs increase oxidative stability of soy lecithin (above 150C). On the basis of GCMS analysis we verified our preliminary hypothesis [1] about participation of sulfenic acids and methylsulfinyl radicals as radical trapping agents responsible for the antioxidant effect of edible ITCs during thermal oxidation of lipids at elevated temperatures (above 140C).[2]

Bibliography:
[1] Cedrowski, J., Dąbrowa, K., Krogul-Sobczak, A., Litwinienko, G.A lesson learnt from food chemistry-elevated temperature triggers the antioxidant action of two edible isothiocyanates: Erucin and sulforaphane. Antioxidants 2020, 9, 1090. DOI: 10.3390/antiox9111090
[2] Cedrowski, J., Dąbrowa, K., Przybylski, P., Krogul-Sobczak, A., Litwinienko, G. Antioxidant activity of two edible isothiocyanates: Sulforaphane and erucin is due to their thermal decomposition to sulfenic acids and methylsulfinyl radicals. Food Chemistry 2021, 353, 129213. DOI: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2021.129213

  • San Ignacio de Loyola University, Peru
  • Title:Development and Application of Biodegradable Packaging by Blown Extrusion
  • Time :

Abstract:

Most of food packaging is mainly petroleum based, trhough plastic precisely. These plastics bring many benefits such as protection, transportation and increasing the shelf life of food. Thus, plastic gained popularity over the years increasing its production and becoming the standard for food packaging. However, there are increasing concerns about its usage and the disposal due to the accumulation in natural habits.This lecture will discus the production of biodegradable food packaging using the same technologies as for plastic packaging, particularly we will discuss blown extrusion. It will contrast the laboratory production (casting technique) vs. extrusion and offer a comparison from a point of view of mechanical properties of the packaging. As applications, it will focus on fruit and vegetables.

Biography:

Alejandro Marzano-Barreda is a Professor of Food Technology and Food Packaging Design in Faculty of Food Engineering at Universidad San Ignacio de Loyola (Peru). Prior to joining the Food Engineering Faculty, Marzano-Barreda serve for 6 years as Senior R&D Specialist specialist in different fields in the agro-industrial sector such as meat, fruits a vegetable processing in Peru and Central America.
Marzano-Barreda is graduate of Zamorano University (B.Sc.Food Science and Technology, Honduras, 2013) and of Londrina State University (M.Sc. in Food Science, Brazil, 2018) where he has part of the Polibiotec research group. Marzano-Barreda is author of journal articles in the field of biodegradable packaging and active packaging.

  • National Institute of Crop Science, Rural Development Administration, Republic of Korea
  • Title:Structural and physicochemical properties of resistant starch from Korean rice cultivars
  • Time :

Abstract:

Resistant starch (RS) is not hydrolyzed into D-glucose in the small intestine and ferments in the large intestine. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) is a major source of carbohydrates and plays an important role in providing energy to the body. The purposes of this research were to elucidate the starch characteristics of different amylose contents in various rice cultivars developed by the National Institute of Crop Science and enhance use of resistant starch (RS)-containing “dodamssal” (DDS) rice as a health-promoting low-glycemic-index (GI) food.
Non-digestible starches (NDS) and native starches (NS) were isolated from four rice cultivars: Baegokchal (BOC), Ilmi (IM), Mimyeon (MM), and DDS. MM- and DDS-derived NS showed high amylose and low rapidly digestible starch contents as well as high slowly digestible starch and RS proportions. The BOC, IM, and MM starch crystals showed A-type X-ray diffractometry patterns. However, the DDS granules displayed a C-type crystallinity pattern with a predominant B-type and convex spherical shape. All the IM and BOC starches were hydrolyzed, with no remaining NDS residues. MM and DDS NDS showed longer average amylopectin chain length but lower molecular weight and viscosity than the NS. The DDS starch had the lowest digestibility and highest RS content, showing its potential to fight obesity and hyperglycemia.

Biography:

Dr. Jiyoung Park received her Ph. D degree from Korea University, and a master’s degree from Pusan National University in Korea. The title of her doctoral dissertation is “ Prebiotic food starch characteristics and materialization fo Dodamssal”. She has worked as a research scientist at the National Institute of Crop Science of the Rural Development Administration since 2012. Her research is focusing on newly developed domestic crops, health food materials, food processing technology. She published 60 papers in domestic and international journals, and applied for 14 patents, of which 9 were registered.

  • University of Nottingham Ningbo China, China
  • Title:General limitations of the current approach in developing sustainable food system frameworks
  • Time :

Abstract:

Current studies on sustainability transitions of the food system (FS) are limited. The tools for assessing FS sustainability and enhancing FS performance are still lacking, highlighting the critical role of developing an assessment indicator framework for assisting sustainable FS transitions. This study seeks opportunities for optimizing existing FS frameworks that address the triple burden of malnutrition and FS sustainability. It ex- amines FS frameworks and other food system-related frameworks such as those linked to food security, food sovereignty, and so on, unveiling the general limitations of current approaches and methodologies in FS frameworks and other related frameworks. To our knowledge, it is the first study to discuss the gaps of FS frameworks regarding their coverage on the food lifecycle and their representation of FS’s multidimensionality. The results indicate that most FS frameworks and related frameworks are conceptual. The most frequent limi- tations are no targeting audience, no coverage of the food disposal stage, and no institutional/political dimen- sion/indicators. Some frameworks have no multi-stakeholder inputs, no coverage of food input and/or food storage stages, no economic or nutritional dimension/indicators, while only a few frameworks involve statistical/ empirical methods or quantitative indicators. Other limitations regarding language, data, and time are also identified. Finally, this study suggests developing a comprehensive multi-dimensional urban food system framework considering the full life cycle of food and combining FS-related perspectives with the five dimensions of environmental, economic, institutional, socio-cultural, and nutritional sustainability to mitigate the lifecycle and sustainability dimension issues and gaps.

Biography:

Tong Zou is a PhD student of the Sustainable Built Environment Research Group at the University of Nottingham Ningbo China. Tong holds a B.Sc. with honours in Integrated Science, minor in Statistics, minor in Technology, Society and Environmental Studies from Carleton University, Canada. In respond to global water crisis, she developed a model prototype of the proposed integrated radiative air well by applying the bio-mimicry features of the Namibia Beetle (Stenocara gracilipes) for her honour’s thesis. Tong is graduated from University of New South Wales with a M.Sc. in Environmental Management. During her postgraduate study, she worked on the project “Urban Metabolism and the Urban Metabolism-Urban Sustainability-Smart Cities Nexus”. During her gap year, Tong Zou worked as a research internship at the Centre of Air pollution energy and the health Research (CAR), Australia; a project assistant of the International Cooperation Centre of Ecology and Environment of Sichuan Province, China; an ecology and environment technological assistant of Sichuan Investment Evaluation and Performance Appraisal Centre of Ecology and Environment, China. Currently, Tong works on the research project on ‘A framework for enhancing urban food system sustainability in smart resilient cities in China’.

  • Research Center for Fine Chemistry Srl, Italy
  • Title:A Mass Spectrometry and 1H NMR Study of Hypoglycemic and Antioxidant Principles from a Castanea sativa Tannin Employed in Oenology
  • Time :

Abstract:

The ethanol extract of the commercial tannin Tan’Activ C, (from Castanea sativa wood), employed in oenology, was subjected to chromatography on XAD-16 affording fractions X1–X5, evaluated for total phenols content (GAE), antioxidant activity (DPPH, ORAC), and hypoglycemic activity (α-glucosidase inhibition). Fraction X3 showed GAE, radical scavenging activity, and α-glucosidase inhibition higher than those of the Castanea sativa extract, and was subjected to chromatography on Sephadex LH-20 to obtain fractions S1–S7, analyzed by HPLC/ESI-MS/MS and 1H NMR to identify the main active constituents. In fractions with higher antioxidant activity, gallic acid (4), grandinin (5), valoneic acid dilactone (9), 1,2,3-tri-O-galloyl-β-glucose (14), 3,4,6-tri-O-galloyl-β-glucose (15) and galloyl derivative of valoneic acid dilactone (21) were identified as the major constituents. The highest hypoglycemic activity was found in fractions S6 and especially S7; the major constituents of these fractions are valoneic acid dilactone (9), three tetragalloyl glucose isomers (16–18) and 1,2,3,4,6-penta-O-galloyl-β-glucose (23), previously reported as α-glucosidase inhibitors.

  • Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture & Technology, Kenya
  • Title:Compliance of Maize Flour Brands to Food Fortification Standards in Kenya
  • Time :

Abstract:

In Kenya, micronutrient deficiencies remain a public health challenge with deficiencies in iron, vitamin A, folate, and zinc reported. Food fortification is a cost-effective intervention to reduce micronutrient deficiencies with the potential to reach a large population. Fortification of packaged maize flour in Kenya is mandatory as per the law passed in 2012. In order to assess fortification compliance, regular market surveillance is necessary. The objective of this work was to determine the level of compliance of commercially milled maize flour brands in Kenya to national set food fortification standards.
Five hundred and ninety seven (597) maize flour samples representing diverse brands were randomly collected from 10 counties and sorted to remove duplicate samples with similar batch numbers yielding 312 analytical samples. The samples were analyzed to determine zinc and iron content using Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy. Vitamins were determined using HPLC by isocratic elution for vitamin A and gradient elution for the B vitamins. Compliance is indicated by samples that meet the national food fortification standards for any two micronutrients among iron, zinc and vitamin A.
From the analysis, 33.3%, 33.9% and 29.9% of the samples complied with national fortification standard for iron, zinc, and vitamin A, respectively. The compliance levels for the B vitamins ranged from 9.7% for folic acid to 84.4% for vitamin B1. Overall, compliance to the national food fortification standards was 28% for all the maize flour samples. We conclude that the flours had low compliance levels to the national food fortification standards for maize flour despite the spirited efforts by both government and the private sector players. This scenario is worrying as it indicates that consumers are not getting the desired nutritional benefits from food fortification.

Biography:

Francis Aila is currently a PhD student in Food Science and Nutrition specializing in Food Fortification with a focus on bioavailability of minerals from fortified foods. He has over 15 years in the field of nutrition having worked with the ministry of health, Kenya. He has publications in food safety in peer reviewed journals from his MSc work and nutrition programming from his work at the ministry of health. He has participated in conferences focusing on health and nutrition in Africa.

X